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Any amount or just five?

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atferrari

Well-Known Member
Isn't contradictory?

Excerpt 5 dollars.png
 

Inquisitive

Super Moderator
Try and buy 50 dollars worth with it and see what happens.

I can see the expression on the judges face now. Good luck with it!

I'm surprised somebody in proof reading did not catch that.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Try and buy 50 dollars worth with it and see what happens.

I can see the expression on the judges face now. Good luck with it!

I'm surprised somebody in proof reading did not catch that.
More to the confusion: "These" instead of "this"... :wideyed:
 

ronsimpson

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Most Helpful Member
I read this a different way. It takes 10 to pay 50 dollars.

Here, some times, a person will pay a tax bill with a truck load of coins. Actually back a dump truck up to the door and dump 1000 pounds of coins.
So, a store does not have to except change on big items. I don't know how much is the limit. Here a coin is not legal tender any amount but paper is.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
Hola
I read this a different way. It takes 10 to pay 50 dollars.

Here, some times, a person will pay a tax bill with a truck load of coins. Actually back a dump truck up to the door and dump 1000 pounds of coins.
So, a store does not have to except change on big items. I don't know how much is the limit. Here a coin is not legal tender any amount but paper is.
Do you mean that this note (and so many more) of 5 dollars could make part of cash payment of 100,000 dollars?


What do you mean with "legal tender", Ron?
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A store must take a 5 dollar bill (and others) on a 100,000 payment.
They do not have to take 10,000,000 one cent pieces.

Legal tender is a medium of payment allowed by law or recognized by a legal system to be valid for meeting a financial obligation.[1] Paper currency and coins are common forms of legal tender in many countries. The origin of the term "legal tender" is from Middle English tendren, French tendre (verb form), meaning to offer. The Latin root is tendere (to stretch out), and the sense of tender as an offer is related to the etymology of the English word "extend" (to hold outward).
 

misterT

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
In Euro countries stores do not have to accept more than 50 coins. I think there are also some kind of rules when stores can legally refuse to accept large bills for small purchase.
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
In Euro countries stores do not have to accept more than 50 coins. I think there are also some kind of rules when stores can legally refuse to accept large bills for small purchase.
If this is not the law it is at least good etiquette.
 
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