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anomalous increase of luminosity of the incandescent bulbs

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ci139

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when i was in colledge (@ past CCCP times) what we did was tapping or snapping your nails against the 60W bulb (preferably when the light is on)
the effect was that it got brighter and brighter until it burned out
by calibrating your snapping it was possible to reach the state where the bulb got as bright as 80W one (only it was more white by color temperature)
that reduced it's service time to half and less of that of it's average normal
but as the 60W bulbs were cheaper and more available in stores the method paid off

i do get that the glow spring inside the bulb must got ?thinner - but i can not exactly imagine the actual processes involved
 

jpanhalt

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I suspect the increase in brightness was due to decreased resistance -- not thinning of the filament -- from intermittent touching of the coils, which spot weld together when done while the bulb is on.
 

GromTag

Active Member
Thinking about the swaying bridge as in one for automotive travel, such as an inventor that claimed that an object oscillating at the correct frequency and mass could destroy an entire building or worse, perhaps the effort is similar to current flow?
That inventors name is Nikola Tesla.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
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I agree with John.
The hot coils of the filament touch together and weld to each other, so shorting out a small section of the filament and reducing the overall resistance.

W = V^2 /R and all that good stuff, so the lamp was brighter.

JimB
 

GromTag

Active Member
Hmm, must be thinking of a different effect... I really need to call it a year. I was assuming effort with reaction, not effort resulting in sustained result.
 

ci139

Active Member
intermittent touching of the coils, which spot weld together
it is possible i guess ...

(the particular mod was relatively easy to achieve and repeatable with quite high success ratio -- if you snapped it too strong it burned out)

namely i had an exploding G9 case recently - the bulb was one of 7 bulb ceiling light - curiously it had worked normally for about the year - the day it exploded there was higher than normal humidity -- it exploded at swicth on

i personally speculate it's due sudden loss of hermeticity -- but now as i remember the past mod. - it just may have had out of range operating temperature - as factory inheritance or all three together : air tightness , operating temp. , weather conditions that favor the strobing of electrical contacts - - - i later (lower humidity) checked the connection terminals to socket contacts resistances
  1. 2.0 , 1.6 Ω
  2. 1.9 , 0.9 Ω ◄ here was the "Bad Boy"
  3. 1.4 , 1.4 Ω
  4. 1.2 , 1.4 Ω
 
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ci139

Active Member
anybody use incandescent light bulbs anymore?
i would - if there was blast safe lamp shades avail with pressure release / redirection slots

the LED replacement has notiseable 50/100 Hz flicker if you move your hands or shake/turn your head (the price for no one to get dead or hospitalized)
 

DerStrom8

Super Moderator
the LED replacement has notiseable 50/100 Hz flicker if you move your hands or shake/turn your head (the price for no one to get dead or hospitalized)
You have some pretty darn cheap LED bulbs then. Most of them operate at a much higher frequency and there is no noticeable flicker.
 

cowboybob

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i do get that the glow spring inside the bulb must got ?thinner - but i can not exactly imagine the actual processes involved
The tungsten filaments were (and still are) tethered, generally in an arc, between the power pins with extra support(s) in the center of the arc.

By making the bulb vibrate, the filament also vibrates (rather violently) and that action stresses the entire filament, weakening them and, in effect, "breaking" or introducing small fissures in the filament. Each fissure reduces the resistance of the filament, thereby allowing an increase in current which results in a brighter filament glow.

The downside is as you noted, i.e., the filament is now operating at a higher current level than it was designed for and one (or more) of the weakened fissure points "burn" through prematurely.

An interesting article...
 
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Reloadron

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I suspect the increase in brightness was due to decreased resistance -- not thinning of the filament -- from intermittent touching of the coils, which spot weld together when done while the bulb is on.
That would be my thinking.

Ron
 
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