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An Amplifier Problem

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antoniodilen

New Member
Hey everybody....

i have a small problem again...

my question is can we take to speaker outs and connect it to one speaker and get double the out put power...

say i have made a power amp with TDA7560...which gives me 4 output channels
(4x45W)my question is can i simply connect two outputs to one speaker
and get 90W per channel? without burning the Ic??

Is there any other way to do this???
i want to do this cuz i'm planing on having to channels for normal speaker and to get the other too out's fixed together and make a sub woofer

Thanks in advance:)
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
No you can't, power is dependent on three things:

1) The voltage output of the amplifier.

2) The impedance of the speaker.

3) The capability of the amplifier to supply enough current to the speaker.

By bridging two amplifiers you can double the voltage output and supply twice the power to twice the impedance, but the actual power is just the same. (such as 100W in 8 ohms instead of 2x50W in 2x4 ohms).

Assuming the amplifiers can be paralled (which many can't) doing so would provide twice the power in half the impedance - so for the example above it would be 100W in 2 ohms.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
here is the specs sheet on the TDA 7560.

Sorry, Like Nigal said some can, some cant. this one cant!
 

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crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You could get a dual voice-coil (DVC) subwoofer and run each of the two outputs to each of the respective voice coils. (See Parts-Express.com - Search Results for example). That would double the power to the speaker.

Edit: According to the amp data sheet you can get 80W per channel for 160W total if you have 2 ohm voice coils, which are available on some subwoofers.
 
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antoniodilen

New Member
thansk for your reply's
any simple amps you guy's can suggests for a car sub woofer??
12V pls

DIY one pls...i dont want to just go and buy it...i want to do it my self..
or else there wont be any fun in it
 
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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
thansk for your reply's
any simple amps you guy's can suggests for a car sub woofer??
12V pls

DIY one pls...i dont want to just go and buy it...i want to do it my self..
or else there wont be any fun in it
Sorry, but just buy one - why pay a LOT more for an inferior product, such amps are available at incredibly low prices.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hey everybody....

i have a small problem again...

my question is can we take to speaker outs and connect it to one speaker and get double the out put power...

say i have made a power amp with TDA7560...which gives me 4 output channels
(4x45W)my question is can i simply connect two outputs to one speaker
and get 90W per channel? without burning the Ic??
The amplifiers are already bridged so you cannot bridge them again.
Connecting two amplifiers in parallel would cause them to fight each other and burn out.

1) Use a higher supply voltage. But the IC might melt.
2) Use a 2 ohms load.

The power at clipping is 15W into 4 ohms with a 13.2V supply.
The power at clipping is 27W into 2 ohms with a 13.2V supply.

The 45W into 4 ohms rating is completely false (the output is a severely clipped saturated square-wave with a 13.7V supply).

i want to do this cuz i'm planing on having to channels for normal speaker and to get the other too out's fixed together and make a sub woofer
A subwoofer needs to use an amplifier more powerful than this one.

A TDA1562 amplifier IC has a voltage doubler circuit inside. It can provide 40W at clipping to a 4 ohm speaker when the supply is 13.2V.
 
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tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
These are the simplest ones I have found so far that also have good wattage and THD ratings. :)
But you will need to build a DC-DC converter circuit to get the higher wattage levels out of them. ;)
I normaly agree with the go out and buy one aproch, But this is a full DIY project so you got my support! :)
 

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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Here is a switched-mode power supply (inverter) for a car that produces 70V at 6A:
Switchmode Power Supply For Car Audio

It is very complicated.
Looks about as simple as you could expect?, probably more so than in a commercial unit.

Which is why I advise just buying an in-car amp, it would probably cost only 1/3 or 1/4 of the price of building one, and be a damn sight smaller so it will fit in the car :D
 

antoniodilen

New Member
Thanks a lot for the help every one...
and thank you very much tcmtech and audio guru for the data sheets

i guess its easyier to buy one...
there is no joy when you buy it from a shop..
so i'm going to try and build one....
thanks again every body
 
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