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A research topic in the ICT field and a little project to demonestrate something related to it.

sram

Member
Hi to all,


I'm currently taking a general ICT course (Wired and Wireless communications, Radios, Antennas, Cyber security, Computer networks....etc), and we will be required to research a topic and write a paper about it. There will also be a presentation which we will need to give to an audience. I know there are many projects out there:



but I'm specifically looking for a project idea that will enable me to give an excellent presentation. I simply want to add a "WOW factor" into my presentation. Last time I was in a similar course I wrote about renewable energy sources and demonstrated how an electrical generator works and they liked it. It was nice to show how you can convert movement into electricity. What I simply did is connect an electrical motor to another one and connect the leads of the second one to a light bulb. When the first motor is turned on, the light bulb will turn on by the electricity generated by the second motor (It is working as a generator in this configuration).

What I'm thinking about:

-Talk about future wireless power transfer and build a simple circuit to demonstrate it (Using inductors). Here I can use the same circuit to demonstrate how an RF signal degrades in power as it propagates in space.

-Talk about cloud computing and its benefits and probably show how easy it is to launch a cyber attack to emphasize the importance of taking security measures before utilizing the cloud (This may be little off topic when it comes to this forum). Note: I have done this before with Kali Linux.

You get the idea. I want to talk about a relevant ICT topic and impress the audience while giving its presentation.

I have a BFO metal detector circuit that I built long ago. I can probably modify it to show some antenna concepts.

Sorry if this thread seems awkward to you. I can write about many topics, but the most important thing is the topic selection, hence this thread. Somebody out there may give an idea that is really suitable and appropriate for what I want. And I'm still thinking/searching myself.

Many thanks.
 

sram

Member
I also thought about underwater communications for submarines. It is a good topic to research and write about, but I'm not sure what to demonstrate for this one. I thought about wireless power transfer, cloud computing, and underwater communication because they are hot topics nowadays I think and there is value in researching them.
 

atferrari

Well-Known Member
You like to talk; a lot.
 

sram

Member
You like to talk; a lot.
Well, thanks anyway. I know my request is little awkward. It is fine if you don't want to help, but I'm genuinely looking for a project/research idea that is interesting in its own right and relevant to today's communication problems and will enable me to demonstrate something cool to watch. This site has helped so many times before and I'm grateful to that.

I forgot to put this into context. It is for defense applications. For the lack of a better idea, I'm currently more inclined toward cloud computing. Everyone is switching to the cloud as there are so many advantages to it. Armies are no different but the catch is the security concerns. So, should defense agencies switch to the cloud? Or ignore it and opt for closed isolated networks for the case of security. This is a good topic to research, and while at it I can demonstrate how cyber attacks can happen. As I'm aware, many armies are reluctant to adapt the cloud because of security concerns as I said. However, the US DoD, awarded either MS or Amazon (I forgot) a 10 billion contract for cloud services. This could only mean that the future is in the cloud and you will have to deal with security. "Secure it and use it" could be the theme of the paper. Cloud computing may not fit here in this specific sub-forum, but I put this here looking for better ideas in communications. The closer the project to communication, the better it is for me.

Also forgot to add: the audience is some technicians with mediocre knowledge in Electronic/Electrical Engineering and communications/IT.

And sorry if I'm so talkative.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As I'm aware, many armies are reluctant to adapt the cloud because of security concerns as I said.
Then those armies should Do like the US Defense Dept and just upload everything to Microsoft or Amazon Cloud storage solution. Easy and... wait, why can'tI get my file? Why is the news media talking about my data!
 

sram

Member
Then those armies should Do like the US Defense Dept and just upload everything to Microsoft or Amazon Cloud storage solution. Easy and... wait, why can'tI get my file? Why is the news media talking about my data!



You don't go and just upload everything. There has to be a mechanism which grants us the advantages of the cloud without scarifying security. You have to secure data at rest and while in transit. When it comes to cloud computing for defense, I have lots of questions myself but this may not be the place for them.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Your NYT article is a bit old and presumptive. More has happened since that muddies the waters on the Microsoft decision.
 

sram

Member
Your NYT article is a bit old and presumptive. More has happened since that muddies the waters on the Microsoft decision.

I just picked up the first entry that showed up in google to show the link here. Please enlighten me about what has happened. I'm really interested in knowing as I always use this example to convince people that cloud computing is the future even for armies. Them considering paying 10 billions for cloud computing tells something. Will go search myself as well....
 
Last edited:

sram

Member

sram

Member
I just thought about something else. It is the conversion of heat directly into electricity using TEG or thermoelectric generator . It seems like there will be a good future for a such concept where you can increase its efficiency and use it effectively afterwards.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/topological-materials-turning-heat-electricity-0117

It is interesting and I think it it will be fun to watch heat being converted into electricity. Now I have to check how these things really work so that I can demonstrate it very well.


This is not a final decision but I think it is good. I'll be researching this now and hopefully will not have many questions.
 

sram

Member
Voila ! I found it. I'll talk about TEG's and link them to satellite communications. They are used in satellites and space probes as energy sources. This will put electricity generation by converting heat into communication context. I'll talk about this and demo how you can generate electricity from heat. That will be nice. I'll go research this. My immediate questions are what would be the advantages of TEG's vs solar power? Why is it an option when it comes to satellites and space probes? It should be better than other options in some aspects inspite of its low effieciency, otherwise it wouldn't be considered.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My immediate questions are what would be the advantages of TEG's vs solar power?
that's an excellent, core question for YOU to address as you prepare YOUR research presentation. We are here to help with the detailed questions but, honestly, your first question is just a sign of laziness.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Also, think about the key design parameters for each application. Mass is important for outer space while cost seems to be less important for outer space. Size, power, mass, price, reliability, durability in a specific application/environment and other factors cause engineers to select specific components.
 

sram

Member
that's an excellent, core question for YOU to address as you prepare YOUR research presentation. We are here to help with the detailed questions but, honestly, your first question is just a sign of laziness.
Oh my God, you are quick to judge. I was just expressing myself or my reaction. I thought about the idea, and immediately put it in here. It was just the first question that came to my mind. It wasn't really like a question for which I want to seek your help while planning to do nothing. I suspect the answer can be found in the first google result.


 

sram

Member
Also, think about the key design parameters for each application. Mass is important for outer space while cost seems to be less important for outer space. Size, power, mass, price, reliability, durability in a specific application/environment and other factors cause engineers to select specific components.
Thanks. I'll come back here if I have questions.
 

sram

Member
Satellites and space probes use RTGs or Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators which is a variant of thermoelectric generators.



I wonder if there are more applications of TEGs in the field of communications and IT. Not only TEGs but any special method of generating electricity such as:
-Alkali-metal thermal to electric converter
-Atomic battery
- Betavoltaic devices ( This is used for military applications but I don't know for what exactly )
- Thermionic converter




Are you guys aware of any use of such methods for the ICT fields? Both for civilian and military.

Thanks.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Some marine buoys and unmanned lighthouses have used isotope-based thermoelectric generators.
Tiny ones were also used in early heart pacemakers.

Peltier effect thermoelectric stacks were often used during WWII to run radios, when batteries were unavailable.
Either "Tea kettle" units with thermoelectric stacks built in, or devices made to be suspended over such as an oil lamp flame.

Some information on those in this link:
 

sram

Member
Some marine buoys and unmanned lighthouses have used isotope-based thermoelectric generators.
Tiny ones were also used in early heart pacemakers.

Peltier effect thermoelectric stacks were often used during WWII to run radios, when batteries were unavailable.
Either "Tea kettle" units with thermoelectric stacks built in, or devices made to be suspended over such as an oil lamp flame.

Some information on those in this link:
This is a very nice catch. WWII usage. But, since WWII is too long ago, does that mean they are not relevant anymore? Are they only useful for space probes and satellites?

And thanks for mentioning marine buoys and unmanned lighthouses, but they are not really communications/Information Technology related.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Lighthouses are one of the oldest communication technologies. It says, "hey, there is a rock or beach here that can wreck your ship." And, "you are at this point on your map".
 

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