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A beep sound.

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stridey

New Member
(tried posting this earlier but it dissapered!, and also couldnt delete my post in the wrong section above.....)

I would like tp build a "beep" sound outputting to speakers, controlled by a button. This is to start a race. Ideally I need a "bb beep" sound, and a "BEEEEEP! sound.

I have seen sound generating circuits, but they all have sirens, otr farmyard animals...I need a nice urgent sounding beep sound, or deeper horn like at a swimming race?

Any ideas?
 

iONic

Member
The easiest way... take down your smoke detector and use the "Test" button to start the race!!!!!

Just kidding really, but for a one time use it would be the cheapest and quickest solution.
 
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audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A Cmos quad Schmitt trigger gate IC can make an iscillator with one resistor and one capacitor. It can be triggered by another of its 4 gates as a monostable to time the duration of the beep.

Its supply current is so low that a battery will power it for a long time and it doesn't need an on-off switch.
 

eblc1388

Active Member
A long beep after several short beeps, initiated with a single push of the button is not easy for a beginner to generate using just CMOS ICs. Several oscillators and a counter is required.

Task like this is easily and best done using a mircocontroller.
 

RadioRon

Well-Known Member
The sound of your beep will be strongly affected by the shape of the electric waveform sent to the speaker. For example, if you send a tone that is a pure sine wave, it will sound quite pure and perhaps "sweet" to you. If you have a square wave, it will sound much more "urgent". Some waveshapes are a blend between the two, like for example a triangle wave is somewhat raspy but not as urgent as the square wave. If you were to distort the square wave by adding overshoot and ringing then it would sound even more urgent and perhaps even a bit weird. So, there are many sounds you can get out of a single tone. To be even more complicated, you can have more than one tone at a time, and you can vary the relative amplitude of these two tones as well as the shape of the waveform of each to experiment with different kinds of beeps. This is what is done in small toy organs (like those little electric pianos that are made for babies to play with, or the kind that are put into children's books) and in fact, if you can find one that is being thrown away this might be a very good starting place for your application.
 
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