Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

40V de-multiplexing chip??

Status
Not open for further replies.

thedude710

New Member
Hello All,
This is my first post and hopefully someone can help me.

I have a square wave signal that has + or - 2V oscillations around 40V (it runs at around 100 to 200kHz). I need to pass this signal through a de-multiplexer but cannot find a multiplexer which can handle ~40V (they all seem to be designed for input voltages of 15V or less). The only solution I can think of is to send the signal through a high pass filter, then through the multiplexer, and then recombine it with a DC offset. Does anyone have a better idea or do you know of lightweight, small multiplexer chips that can handle this voltage?

If the only solution is to high pass filter it then recombine it with a dc offset, what is the best way to recombine the dc offset? I know I can use opamps but is there a simpler, lighter way? Thanks
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
You can recombine the offset by just coupling the signal through a capacitor. Connect a resistor at the capacitor output to a 40V source. The time-constant of the resistor and capacitor must be high enough to pass the lowest frequency without attenuation. For 100kHz the time constant should be greater than 2µs.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top