Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

4,096MHz quartz crystall and CMOS 4060 IC

Status
Not open for further replies.

xx77aBs

New Member
Hello ! I've tried to connect 4,096MHz quartz crystall to 4060 IC, but unfortunately it doesn't work :( I get too slow frequency ...

Here's the scheme I've used:
4060crys-1.gif


I've connected everything like shown, except I've put in the 4,096MHz crystal. And it doesn't work. Could it be because of resistors' and capacitors' values? How can I calculate what values should I use? Does anyone have another scheme with 4060 and 4,096MHz crystal?

Thanks for help :)
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
hi,
The resistor values for the xtal are far too high, look at this image.
 

Attachments

  • AAesp01.gif
    AAesp01.gif
    45.4 KB · Views: 1,280
  • AAesp02.gif
    AAesp02.gif
    27.2 KB · Views: 1,139
Last edited:

xx77aBs

New Member
Wow, values are really too high, I'll try with values from your images, thanks :D
Just one question ... It says for one resistor that it should be from 100k to 1M ... Should I just pick one value or do I have to calculate it somehow ??

Thanks :)
 
Last edited:

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What is the supply voltage for the CD4060? At 5V that device is only good up to 3.5MHz.
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Wow, values are really too high, I'll try with values from your images, thanks :D
Just one question ... It says for one resistor that it should be from 100k to 1M ... Should I just pick one value or do I have to calculate it somehow ??

Thanks :)
hi,
Which technology is your 4060.??

eg: HEF or HCT or CD etc... the modern versions will work well over 4MHz at 5v.
 
Last edited:

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The problem with the HEF4060 is that its upper frequency is rather low, and crystals at less than 10 MHz or so are more difficult to get to oscillate.

It would be easier to use an HC4060 and a 16.384 MHz crystal. You won't need the series resistance (the 330k one) at all. connect the crystal directly to pins 10 and 11.

BTW, there is virtually no difference between the HCT4060 and the HC4060. The only difference is the input level of the MR input. All other characteristics are the same, and the clock input has the same voltage levels on both types.
 

xx77aBs

New Member
What crystal are you using? I know that it is 4.096 MHz, but what holder is it in? An HC49 will have the best activity.

I don't know what holder is it ... How can I tell ?

as for your previous post, I've already used 4060 with 32,768 kHz crystal (with upper scheme) and it worked flawlessly ...
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you are trying to make a high frequency crystal oscillator on a breadboard then it won't work because of the high capacitance between all the contacts and the high inductance of the wiring.
 

xx77aBs

New Member
If you are trying to make a high frequency crystal oscillator on a breadboard then it won't work because of the high capacitance between all the contacts and the high inductance of the wiring.

yeah, I'm using breadboard :( Can you tell me up to what frequency is it OK to use breadboard ?
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I think a lousy old breadboard works pretty well up to about 1kHz (like old germanium transistors).
I have used stripboard and pcbs for 45 years ever since my first breadboard AM radio didn't work.
 

xx77aBs

New Member
I think a lousy old breadboard works pretty well up to about 1kHz (like old germanium transistors).
I have used stripboard and pcbs for 45 years ever since my first breadboard AM radio didn't work.

Hm, I've successfully used protoboard/breadboard with 32768Hz quartz ... I guess when I need anything faster, I'll use stripboard :)
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I made a 3.58MHz oscillator on stipboard with ordinary Cmos logic and a 9V battery that dropped to 6V over its life and the circuit worked very well.
 

xx77aBs

New Member
oh, I misunderstood your last post :) Thanks for clarifying :) I'll still try using smaller resistor values as suggested by ericgibbs.

Thank you all for your time :D
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
oh, I misunderstood your last post :) Thanks for clarifying :) I'll still try using smaller resistor values as suggested by ericgibbs.

Thank you all for your time :D

hi,
With regard to breadboards aka project boards, I have used crystals from 1MHz thru 20MHz without any problems, this also applies to SRBP stripboard
In fact at the present I have a breadboard projects with USB PIC's running at 20MHZ.

So don't be put off by old wives tales and web mythology, just ensure your projects always have good decoupling on the power rails and keep your wire links short and tidy.

BTW:
A ~4MHZ crystal should work without any problems when using a HEF4060.
 

Attachments

  • AAesp03.gif
    AAesp03.gif
    55.6 KB · Views: 509
Last edited:

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The max clock pulse frequency is the frequency for the digital counter, not for the analog crystal oscillator.
The minimum oscillator frequency is important not the maximum frequency.

I have a graph that shows typical the frequency response of a linear inverter in a crystal oscillator. There is a little gain at a few MHz when the supply is only 5V. 10V is much better. Devices with minimum spec's have reduced high frequencies. Circuits built on a breadboard also have reduced high frequencies.
 

Attachments

  • Cmos amp.PNG
    Cmos amp.PNG
    18.6 KB · Views: 380
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top