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12v to 230v

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ptw

New Member
Hi everybody,

Can somebody please bring out a circuit diagram to convert 12v to 230v.
 
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Mikebits

Well-Known Member
You can buy these sort of devices for much cheaper than you could build one.
 

Torben

Well-Known Member
12v DC to 230v AC, above 300W.
About 500W is much better.
Yup, Mike was right--much cheaper to buy one than to try to build it. Especially if you need it sometime this year. ;)


Torben
 

ptw

New Member
Actually I'm from Sri Lanka, so 60US$ is a big cost for me. I hope I'll be able to make a one less than 10$.
 
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Sceadwian

Banned
10 dollars I doubt you're gonna find anything that cheap.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
The china version would probaby go up in flames after 12 hours of operation =O
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Hey now! In defence (sort of) of cheap chinese crap, start taking a close look at your "good" inverters and other power electronics you buy at the store and pay good money for. ;)
Around half are chinese made, of the remaining half most of them will be from tiawan, indonesia, the phillippines, or some unhread of country. And the one or two you could buy that are american made will probibly have a factory recall in the first year or so due to a manufacturing flaw. :(

Sad, but take a good look at all the brand names out there and where their product is actualy made or who its made by and where their stuff comes from.
You may just be surprized and a little disapointed in your beliefs. I know I was when I started doing research on where things come from. :(
 

ptw

New Member
Somebody please bring out a circuit diagram to convert 12v DC to 230v AC. I'll find out which one is cheaper.Making a one or buying a one.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Since you are building your own here is some things to help you out.
Its a edited down reprint of something I wrote for another thread simmilar to yours. It could be useful information. :)

Points of recomendation:
1: I would seriously consider runnng a 5 to 10 uf PFC capacitor on the output side. This will round off the square wave and give you a more accurate voltage reading. It wont be exact but it will be closer.

2: When the switching devices turn off they will get a large voltage spike that needs to be handled some how. That magnetic field energy in the transformer has to go some place durring that off time between each half of the driver circuit cycles or it just builds up voltage where you least want it! Namely at the switching devices themselves.

3: A lower voltage AC capacitor of perhaps 1 - 3 uf per running amp in series with a 10 ohm or so resistor connected across the ends of the primary will greatly help protect the Mosfets.

The PFC capacitor will take some of that spike and help recycle it back into the system creating a LC tank effect and greatly reducing the idle current as well. But still, the primary is going to get a spike that could be fairly high when there is no actual load on the output.

I am just guessing at the capacitor and resistor values do to the fact I do not know what VA rating and core saturation values your transformer may have. But I do know you are still far better off with them than without. reguardless of if they are sized exactly correct or not.

I have built enough homemade "DR. frankenstien" inverters to know these added components will greatly help in the overall duribility and running efficiency. It is still a crude unregulated design but it does have potential. And I would shoot for a 15% over line voltage number at no load. You are not going to get away from the voltage sag with load increase on this type of circuit. :(
I would not be the least bit surprized to see it drop to 15% under voltage or more at is maximum rated capacity too! :eek:
 
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