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110v Radio to work in UK

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NewcastleSAR

New Member
Hi Folks..

Just a quick post. My father-in-law was given a radio cassette DVD player by his daughter-in-law who is from the states. Unfortunately the radio is 110 voltage. What is the best way to operate it in the UK.

Is doesn't seem to be a 110/240 transformer going by the details on the outer casing. He tried running it on uk mains but it failed. It works okay on batteries but he'd like to operate it from the mains.

Regards

Declan
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Just use a little 240 to 120 step down transformer. I doubt it needs much power. This assumes the AC input wasn't damaged when he ran it on UK mains. That or remove the batteries and use a battery eliminator.

Ron
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
He probably blew-up the internal power supply. To run it via an external 240-120V step-down transformer, you will have to fix the internal supply.
Using a plug-in Wall-Wart that makes the appropriate DC (6V?, 9V?) is likely the best option.
 

NewcastleSAR

New Member
Hi Ron & Mike..

What's the best way to check if the AC transformer is kaput!! I do have a feeling it is gone though.

I was thinking about using a DC power unit and removing the AC side of things altogether. I suppose it depends on what exactly he wants me to do.

If using the DC PSU method, where is the best place to connect it to on the circuitboard so that it doesn't interfere with the batteries if he wishes to use it outside.

Many thanks

Declan
 
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MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Use a coaxial socket which has an auxiliary switch contact which is wired to isolate the battery pack while the external plug is inserted into the socket. Removing the external plug automatically reconnects the battery...
 
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Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
If you plugged it in 240V mains for even an instant, the transformer is blown - they have a thermal fuse inside the windings, and this has probably blown (it's not replaceable).
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The American radio will sound "muffled" with missing high audio frequencies when receiving FM in the UK because the equalization standards are different.
 

NewcastleSAR

New Member
Cheers Folks..

Many thanks for the replies. I don't think the father-in-law is too worried about FM radio. He's more interested in playing CD's

Regards

Declan
 

canadaelk

Active Member
1 1/2 things here:
From what I recall from my eternety in service: The 19kHz pilot-tone for the stereo-encoder in NA is 0.7Vpp, in Europe it is 0.3V, so some mod to the encoder is required to detect the lower signal to get stereo FM
From what I recall the European AC (230V) is balanced about the neutral, 115V each leg. This could give you the 115V you need, quite illigally, I am sure. And I did not mention it!
Cheers, E
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
1 1/2 things here:
From what I recall from my eternety in service: The 19kHz pilot-tone for the stereo-encoder in NA is 0.7Vpp, in Europe it is 0.3V, so some mod to the encoder is required to detect the lower signal to get stereo FM
From what I recall the European AC (230V) is balanced about the neutral, 115V each leg. This could give you the 115V you need, quite illigally, I am sure. And I did not mention it!
Cheers, E
What you recall is complete nonsense - Europe uses 230V single phase, derived from 230V three phase, with domestic premises receiving one of the phree phases and a neutral. You're thinking of the strange American 110/220V system.
 
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