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100W with TDA2030

Discussion in 'Electronic Projects Design/Ideas/Reviews' started by chiriac_marius, Oct 13, 2004.

  1. chiriac_marius

    chiriac_marius New Member

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    Did U ever think it can be posible?...
    All U need now is a power sorce.
     

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  2. chiriac_marius

    chiriac_marius New Member

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    here is the mono vresion.
     

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  3. chiriac_marius

    chiriac_marius New Member

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    Stereo version
     

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  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    What kind of Watts are you talking about?
    A 36V supply (the absolute maximum of the TDA2030) if unregulated will probably sag to 33V or less at full power. The TDA2030 will have an output swing of only 28Vp-p because it isn't bootstrapped. The RMS of 28Vp-p is only 9.9V, so the the power for an 8 ohm speaker is only 12W!
    Maybe 25W into a 4 ohm speaker? (if the output transistors and power supply can handle the current). It would measure about 35W with an awful-sounding 10% distortion (square-waves) which you could say is 70W peak. You could also measure "music-power" (just for a moment before the power supply voltage sags) and end up with 100 WHATS! Not 100 Watts.
    With a 36V regulated supply then its continuous power will be maintained.

    If you want much more power then use TDA2030A ICs which are rated at 44V. Use regulated +, - 22V to supply a bridged amp (the speaker is powered from both ends, out-of-phase) and a 4 ohm speaker will get about 190W RMS at low distortion. That's about 570 WHATS! 1.14 Kilo-WHATS!
     
  6. chiriac_marius

    chiriac_marius New Member

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    :wink: power supply is 18v that schematic shows 2X50W at 8 Ohmi but in bridge 1X100W at 4 Ohmi
    At 75% of it`s power TDA2030 becomes the driver for the BDX54C and for the BDX53C. :lol: if U dont bellive me ask this guy here named Vasile.
    http://forum.izatech.ro/viewtopic.php?t=1608
     
  7. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    With a single ended output, and a 36V supply, assuming zero losses, you can only get a maximum of 20.26W into an 8 ohm load!. For a 4 ohm load this would double to 40.52W - but in practice it would be rather less. There's no way to get 50W into an 8 ohm load, from a single ended amplifier off a 36V supply (apart from output transformers).

    A more likely spec is 50W into 2 ohms, which would translate into 100W into 4 ohms in bridge mode - the extra power transistors would give the extra power required for 2 ohm loads.

    But it's a pretty poor design, more a toy than a practical design?. Far better using a decent supply rail and a 'proper' power amplifier to give 100W into 4 ohms.
     
  8. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I don't speak Romanian so I can't argue about its power output over there.
    If you don't believe Nigel and me, look at exactly the same circuit in the datasheet for the TDA2030A: http://home.eunet.cz/rysanek/pdf/tda2030a.pdf
    With a 36V regulated supply, it produces only 28WRMS into 4 ohms at clipping (0.5% distortion), 35WRMS with a horrible-sounding 10% distortion. The datasheet is very good, it even shows how much sag and ripple occur with an unregulated supply.

    I found an article for a "200 WHATS" amplifier kit using two of your "50 WHATS" amps that are bridged. It uses TDA2030's probably because the "A" version came later. It is a detailed article with PCB layout, etc.
    There is no way that it will produce 200 Watts, but it will be close with a 44V regulated supply and TDA2030A IC's:
    http://www.electronics-lab.com/projects/audio/013/index.html 200W amp project
     
  9. chiriac_marius

    chiriac_marius New Member

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    I have built it and it dose exactly what I said
    whay dont U built it and see for Ur self ist not that expensive.
    U have all U need even the PCB file.
     
  10. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi Chiriac,
    I have designed, built and tested many amplifiers and know that you cannot get 50WRMS into 8 ohms when using a supply of only 36V total.

    Did you measure the power output with an oscilloscope seeing that it is not clipping?
    Don't you believe the manufacturer of the TDA2030A on their datasheet that I posted?

    Simple arithmatic shows that 50WRMS into 8 ohms is a sine-wave voltage of 56.56V peak-to-peak. Your 36V supply total is nowhere near that. :roll:
     
  11. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Same here!, but as I posted above, I think he made a mistake in his post - it should have been 50W into 2 ohms (not 8 ohms). This is quite possible from 36V, with the extra transistors providing the current required - and it would give 100W into 4 ohms in bridge mode.

    But as a home designer and builder of amplifiers for over 30 years, I wouldn't consider building this one! - for very little more effort you could build a 'proper' 100W amplifier.
     
  12. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi Nigel,
    I agree that if it uses a regulated 36V supply, it will give 100WRMS at fairly low distortion into a 4 ohm load. :D
    I wonder how much power is wasted in its speaker fuse. :roll:
    Just think about how much over their rating the output transistors are exceeding their SOA! Paralleled transistors are needed. :wink:
    The manufacturer's circuit avoids problems by using an 8 ohm load when the amps are bridged.
     
  13. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Well, I must admit I hadn't looked at the spec on the transistors used, I'd presumed they were a lot better than they are!. Certainly pushing them rather hard! - not devices I would have chosen!.
     
  14. chiriac_marius

    chiriac_marius New Member

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    Ok,
    if U all say that it`s not what it seames to be could anybody tell me how much a relly good amp cost if I whant to buy it let`s say from england + the expencises for the pachege?
    Or better, witch one of U has an amp for sale but someting good with tubes over 200W...
    Someting like this
     

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  15. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Try having a look here http://www.ampslab.com/projects.htm, they look pretty impressive!.

    What are you actually wanting an amp for?, and why do you have a wish for a valve one? - personally I don't like valve amps, only suitable for lead guitar amplifiers in rock bands, simply for the overdriven distortion sound they like.
     
  16. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Vacuum tooooooooobes? Valves are in engines, aren't they? (Those Brits!)

    Did you hear about the guy who is making the world's most powerful audio amp with paralleled transmitter tubes (valves?). He has blown the main mains breaker in his office building and uses welded railroad tracks for a dummy load! 300W or more for each tube's heater!

    The web is full of sites with guitar amps. Here is another one with big amps, still bigger and even tube amps. It shows a huge amp and its enormous crossover distortion. Hold your ears, here it is:
    http://www.mif.fg.gda.pl/homepages/tom/schematics.htm
     
  17. alinaghavi0111

    alinaghavi0111 New Member

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    Hey, and do not bother w
    Schematic map number 4 so that the order of the numbers from one to four named what?
     
  18. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Please speak in English then we know what you are talking about.

    Maybe you are talking about the first schematic that shows a stereo amplifier that can be bridged by connecting the numbered and lettered terminals?
    Its little transistors will probably blow up.
     
  19. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Deleted double post.
     
  20. chemelec

    chemelec Well-Known Member

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    ;);) The 100 Watts is Probably DC Input Power.
     
  21. audioguru

    audioguru Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    When an amplifier is very over-driven so that its output is a square-wave then it does not heat up much. Almost all the power supply power goes to the speaker.
     

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