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Your Choice: Hot Air or Hot Iron for Soldering?

Discussion in 'Electronic Projects Design/Ideas/Reviews' started by MrAl, Oct 31, 2014.

?

Hot Air or Hot Iron?

  1. Hot Air

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Hot Iron

    100.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi,

    What do you think is better?
     
  2. cowboybob

    cowboybob Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I don't do PCB SMD circuits... so point soldering control very important to me (as though anyone cares :woot:).
     
  3. Overclocked

    Overclocked Member

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    I do SMD and I use a Iron. Ive managed to do MSOP packages. Ive done QFN packages on a hot plate (no PID control though).
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I have both, but haven't used hot air yet. I have some packages (DFN-8 with two thermal pads) that I'll be using or try to use, that would be difficult to use an iron.
    I bought a very nice soldering station from Circuit Specialists.

    BGA's would be impossible too although these may need preheating from the opposite side.

    So, I think your survey is invalid. The iron works sometimes.
     
  6. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi,

    What do you mean "invalid" ?
     
  7. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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  8. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    So then dont choose "iron", right?
     
  9. tvtech

    tvtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Grrr..

    Soldering I know with an Iron. Only like 38 Years experience here with everything from the old Antex Irons and everything in between. 51 here and have been there. I still have my little Antex 18W Iron I proudly bought when my Mom allowed me to use a 220VAC Iron for the first time....instead of flattening my Dad's car battery with a 12VDC Iron in the garage...and his car would not start the next Day..... he was the Boss of the place he was employed at...the Manager is late...his car won't start...and it was a Merc.

    Around 1974 something.

    Digressing, my poor parents. They put up with my stuff. And @ the age of 51, I am still as crazy as hell. I probably drive everyone crazy that knows me.

    Except the people that work with me:

    I have my reasons for doing things the way I do. And it works.
    I know the road. I know how to not make more work for myself or anybody working next to me.
    I know how to make money for a company with minimal effort.
    I know how to treat repairs with the respect they deserve....give me crap to fix...I charge. Give me decent stuff that nobody has fiddled with...minimum charge. No matter my effort.

    That's the way I do stuff. No private jobs. No after hours work. No slyness.

    Straight forward in the Customers face..........they know I live here on the premises...they know that I can possibly do favors after hours for them :(

    Simply not interested. I am a bit of a****** ****** that way. It's either through the business or nothing.

    I sleep peacefully at night knowing I walk the talk.

    Regards,
    tvtech
     
  10. tvtech

    tvtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    ^^^Sorry

    Had to get stuff off my chest. Without starting a new thread. And keeping peace and all.

    Regards,
    tvtech
     
  11. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Kind use was fits the job. At my employment, I had access to a resistance soldering system. Best thing for soldering terminals.

    I also did nearly daily soldering with Indium, so a very small iron was used for that.

    Then I had access to oxy/MAPP, oxy/acetelene, or oxy/propane or oxy/hydrogen torches

    I have one of those 100 W Weller guns, but I use a butane iron for those jobs now. Besides it heats up fast and has a heat shrink attachment.

    I used to have a Propane torch with a soldering iron attachment. The torch end got stolen. Now, THEY don;t want you to disconnect anything, e.g. paint stripper, soldering iron, pencil tip and regular tip just changing the heads.

    So, I have a small iron and a medium sized iron not temperature controlled at home and a full blown one of these: http://www.circuitspecialists.com/bk6000.html

    No percipience yet with stencils. Plan to shortly.
     
  12. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi,

    One thing i noticed about hot air is it heats up quick, so you can start soldering right away. I hate waiting for my regular iron to heat up. Maybe the resistive element irons heat up faster than the inductive type element irons?
     
  13. kubeek

    kubeek Well-Known Member

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  14. tvtech

    tvtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Nice station kubeek

    I hate to admit this after many years and many experiences with irons....original Wellers before Cooper Tools became involved were the finest around.

    Instant heat on demand.

    I know people like AG that are still using original Weller irons that are yonks old. And are still 100% reliable.

    I burned my fingers with Weller in the 90's. Saved my money for many Months. Bought a Weller. It failed within 6 Months......it was supposed to have lasted a lifetime....a Rolls Royce product....

    Regards,
    tvtech
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2014
  15. picbits

    picbits Well-Known Member

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    I started a new job as an Electronics Engineer a month or so ago and our department was given a "windfall" to buy some extra tools.

    I suggested the Metcal soldering iron and they bought a couple - I got a rather nice MFR-1100 which is a seriously nice bit of kit to work with. Heat up times in around 10 seconds and when you put the iron back in the holder it throttles back the heat to save the bit. It even powers off if you don't use it for a couple of hours.

    I've soldered everything from small stuff to whopping great capacitors on a heavy ground plane and it has coped with it all.
     
  16. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi,

    For 500 dollars it better heat up in less than 5 seconds :)
     
  17. Overclocked

    Overclocked Member

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    I bought this one from MPJA a while back, it takes ~1 minute to heat up. While its getting ready Im usually getting all my parts situated and opened.
     

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