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Xmas light string controller

Discussion in 'Electronic Projects Design/Ideas/Reviews' started by John12345, Dec 6, 2017 at 11:25 AM.

  1. John12345

    John12345 New Member

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    Hi. I want to control 5 Xmas light strings using one of the light string controllers. One controller is not powerful enough to run many of them at once so I would like to amplify the variable signal. One controller puts out a variable voltage from 0 to 110 VDC. Each string has a resistance of 105 ohms. I would need a circuit or transistor or Mosfet that would be capable of 110VDC and an amperage of about 5 amps (for 5 strings). I tried to measure the amperage of each string and read about 0.15 amps so I must be doing something wrong here or my meter is bad. I bought a Mouser mosfet p/n FCPF099N65S3 which I thought would work but I can’t figure out how to put together the circuit. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. dknguyen

    dknguyen Well-Known Member

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    Are you sure it's a variable voltage between 0 and 110VDC that is used (for example to fade the lights)? If it is, it won't be so simple. and you're better off getting more controllers. It would be much simpler if it the controller achieved fading by by blinking the lights faster than the human eye can perceive for periods of time or shorter/longer duty cycles.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 11:54 AM
  3. John12345

    John12345 New Member

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    I am not sure that the voltage is variable. I can only say that when measured with a simple meter it seems to be. I don't have an oscilloscope. Here are some pictures of the controller guts. Using more controllers would be simple but then all of the strings of lights would not be synchronized. Control1.JPG Control1.JPG Control3.JPG Control2.JPG
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. dknguyen

    dknguyen Well-Known Member

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    Is the 110VDC being supplied by that board? Is it offboard?
     
  6. John12345

    John12345 New Member

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    Supply voltage is 120vac and converted to dc.
     
  7. dknguyen

    dknguyen Well-Known Member

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    But the conversion is not done on this board right? It's done by a brick somewhere else along the wire? If that's the case, it seems to be chopping the signal so a MOSFET should work. Does this light string just blink the lights or walk the lights or can it also fade them in and out too?

    You will also need:

    1. A 110VDC@5A supply
    2. A circuit to convert 110VDC from the controller to a ~20V signal that can drive the MOSFET (the MOFSET gate can accept up to 30V).

    The current you measured might be smaller because if you are using bulbs and not LEDs, the resistance of the bulb increases as the bulb heats up so you would get a lower current than if you went I = 110VDC/[Cold resistance]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 2:10 PM
  8. John12345

    John12345 New Member

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    Thanks. I have all of the above items except I don't know how to wire up the circuit. The ac is converted on board with the diode rectifier.
     
  9. dknguyen

    dknguyen Well-Known Member

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    The circuit here is the basic idea. I assume there's two strings of lights and each string has a positive and ground wire? You would need two of them if that's the case.

    EDIT: Typo on the schematic. The 4.7K resistor doesn't need to be 5W. It can be pretty much any resistor wattage (it's 80mW dissipation).
     

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    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017 at 2:54 PM
  10. John12345

    John12345 New Member

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    Thank you very much. You have been a very big help.
     
  11. tcmtech

    tcmtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I have worked on similar light controllers and they are not exactly as the seem. Some used triac control of the AC power and others use a SCR output which I suspect yours is the second design and not using a mosfet or transistor output.

    I could be wrong being without a part number to identify what the three TO-92 case output devices are, there is no easy way to tell but logically for simplicity of control from a tiny uC that is under the black blob on the vertical circuit board SCR's would be the simplest and easiest to control given the rectified and unfiltered power available.

    Which if so modifying that controller to drive larger external SSR's (Solid State Relays) would not be all that hard.
     
  12. John12345

    John12345 New Member

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    Yes. Mine is the second design. They use 3 thyristors - XL1225. I'll look into getting larger ones. Thanks for all your help.
     
  13. dknguyen

    dknguyen Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering why there were 3 TO cases and not just two.
     

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