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Worldwide lighting made 20% more efficienct.

Discussion in 'Members Lounge' started by Flyback, Jun 29, 2013.

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  1. tcmtech

    tcmtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    It's already used worldwide in countless devices and systems ranging from micro power to multi 100's of KW including numerous lighting systems and EV charging as well.
     
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  2. Flyback

    Flyback Well-Known Member

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    OK thanks, but i just googled "High frequency alternating current" ; "High frequency alternating current technology" ; "High frequency alternating current products" ; "High frequency alternating current equipment" ; "HFAC ..." etc etc, and find no examples of it in use anywhere....all i find is 'ieeexplore' type academic articles explaining what it is.
     
  3. tcmtech

    tcmtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    In lighting it's used in solid state ballasts for CFl's, normal fluorescent tube type lamps, solid state ballasts for HID lighting, and induction lighting and so on.

    In more familiar settings any switchmode power supply uses HF AC or HF PWM and any portable device that uses a power conversion system to change the lower 12 volt DC automotive voltage into a higher one for such things as power inverters and audio amplifiers use it as well.

    In the industrial applications it's used in the high power inverter based power supplies for plasma cutters, arc welders, induction heaters, electroplating machines, and many types of variable frequency AC motor drives.

    As I said it's used everywhere and has been for several decades now.
     
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  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. ChrisP58

    ChrisP58 Well-Known Member

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    Aren't radio and TV signals High Frequency AC?

    and the (not Isotera) induction lighting mentioned earlier in this thread.

    and radar...

    and Microwave ovens....

    and ....
     
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  6. kubeek

    kubeek Well-Known Member

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    One thing that comes to my mind is how does isotera cope with the cleanliness of the surfaces of the ferrite core. If there is an airgap I think it would quite harm the transfer, right?
     
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  7. Flyback

    Flyback Well-Known Member

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    Sorry i meant HFAC power transmission....not just HFAC. So i meant applications using HFAC power transmission...over several yards or more. That is, a power bus passing HFAC, instead of the usual 50Hz or DC....Passing it along some distabce of several yards , or much more, to the device which couples into this HFAC power bus, and then uses the power
     
  8. throbscottle

    throbscottle Well-Known Member

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    There was talk of this in, ummm, might have been New Scientist a while back - talk about cordless charging and mains power supply systems - I might be mistaken but, one of the big manufacturers was researching the viability of cordless power to something like a TV, but this was over feet, not fractions of inches. It's horribly inefficient, they were looking at how to make it might be made usable.
     
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  9. schmitt trigger

    schmitt trigger Active Member

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    Didn't Tesla attempt wireless power transmission almost 100 years ago?
     
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  10. kubeek

    kubeek Well-Known Member

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    Attempting is not the same thing as making it work.
     
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  11. schmitt trigger

    schmitt trigger Active Member

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    My point, exactly
     
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  12. ronv

    ronv Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Lots of wireless chargers out there for cell phones etc. Similar to Flybacks stuff but without the Ferrite. I was going to build one for my wireless mouse but I decided the cord was ok.
     
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  13. alec_t

    alec_t Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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  14. Flyback

    Flyback Well-Known Member

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    .......this isn't a "killer" problem. On the charger (if an emergency unit is used), its amazing how misaligned the ferrites can be and still get good power throughput)
    Regarding dirt, well, you don't want dirt on the surfaces that's true, but you can easily operate it with muddy hands and avoid getting dirt on the surfaces.
    For guys on oil rigs etc, who need hot-pluggable lighting for jobs out on exposed parts of the rig at 3am, where there might be explosive gas in the air, its well worth using isotera and dirty ferrite surfaces isn't something that puts you off using isotera.
    ..isotera is hot-pluggable with NO contact sparks......add that to the waterproof -ness of a group of lights on an isotera bus, and you have a system that many people will be very keen on.

    By the way , other than academic research such as from Tesla etc, I cannot find any off-the-shelf applications that use high frequency "wired"(rather than 'wireless') power bus transmission...I am talking about 10's of KHz and greater....(obviously excepting isotera)
    The wireless phone chargers are wireless power transmission.

    Does anyone know of an application involving an off-the-shelf , high frequency power bus transmission?.....transmission over several yards or more of cable?
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2013
  15. tcmtech

    tcmtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Nope dead wrong again. :mad:

    I worked in the oil fields three summers ago driving supper vac truck for a few months and spent loads of time on oil rigs doing cleanup work. and I can assure you if gas levels were that high alarms would be going off all over the place.

    In fact everyone I saw who worked on the rigs had multigas clip on monitors they wore everywhere and I had one as well.

    The other thing is oil rigs are designed to industrial hazardous location safety spec codes that require all lighting and electrical systems to be built to full explosion proof standards and are inspected regularly to make sure they meet those safety codes. Many of them even had cell phone bans in place and anyone even carrying a cell phone on a site would have it taken away and could not get it back until they left the site.

    On top of all of that they also have minimum lighting standard codes they need to meet as well which means that they are very well lit to begin with.

    In fact most are so well lit that if you are within two city blocks of a rig site you can work in the middle of the night without ever needing a flashlight. ;)

    The clunky open wire twisted pair power distribution design of the isotera systems would get them tossed in the trash as soon as the first inspector walked by one. :(

    So once again I can assure you from personal experience that the isotera systems would not be used on oil rigs. :(
     
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  16. Flyback

    Flyback Well-Known Member

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    The isotera system is the only system in the world where you can hot plug a lamp without contact sparks.
    The question is, who needs that quality?......wherever that company is, they are going to be delighted by isotera.
     
  17. tvtech

    tvtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Well said tcmtech

    Thanks for stepping in. This whole Isotera thing is driving me nuts.

    Regards,
    tvtech
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2013
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  18. alec_t

    alec_t Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Who indeed :)
     
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  19. tcmtech

    tcmtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    You have no clue about the designs of equipment used in the hazardous locations lighting and power industry do you?:confused: :mad:

    Almost every situation you have used to brag up the isotera system has came across to those who are actually educated and familiar with said applications to be about as well founded as saying cars run on unicorn pee and not gasoline. :(

    Just quit already.
     
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  20. Flyback

    Flyback Well-Known Member

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    ..your willingness to shed light here is very commendable , and I mean that.
    I am pretty sure that like all other industries, the designs and technologies used in those specific industries is kept as a very closely guarded secret as they won't want competitors to get in on their "wagon"...............and you're right, I know not a jot about how they do it.....I am however, fascinated to find out....does anyone wish to shed lite here?.................if you can tell me why isotera, which is a "contact spark-less system", is not useful to these industries, then I am even more fascinated...seriously
     
  21. tcmtech

    tcmtech Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Their components are standard industry design and can be found at any electrical supply center or online.

    The designs are about as secret as how a light switch or outlet are designed. There are dozens of manufacturers and all of them design their components to industry standard specs.

    No real secrets.
    https://www.nema.org/Standards/pages/default.aspx

    Do searches for NEMA and ANSI standards if you want to know more about industry standardization specs and related rules.
     
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