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Wireless: short-hop vs. short-range — what's the difference?

Discussion in 'Radio and Communications' started by cmyguo3o, Nov 21, 2016.

  1. cmyguo3o

    cmyguo3o New Member

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    Can you explain me the difference between short-hop wireless and short-range wireless, if any?
     
  2. JimB

    JimB Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    I don't think that I have ever heard the expression "short-hop wireless".

    However in English the expression "short-hop" is an informal way of saying that some where is not far away.

    For example:
    Longside is just a short hop from Peterhead.

    Look at this map fragment cut from Google Maps.

    Map Fragment.png

    Does that help?

    JimB
     
  3. Ian Rogers

    Ian Rogers Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Hopping in wireless terms means channel hopping.... If your wireless device has 16 available channels you can hop from 1 ~ 16 to make a more reliable communication..
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. cmyguo3o

    cmyguo3o New Member

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    Thank you for the input, JimB and Ian Rogers. Here is an example of a text containing that expression:

    http://www.rpsea.org/media/files/fi...lligent_Prod_Sys_Short_Hop-Tubel_06-23-10.pdf
    "Intelligent Production System for Ultra Deepwater with Short Hop Wireless Power and Wireless Data Transfer for Lateral Production Control and Optimization"

    I know that often the word "hop" is used where some kind of re-translation takes place, like "multi-hop network". I doubt that in this case the word relates to channel-hopping, because I have trouble imagining what "short-hop" would then mean. It's most probably related to distance, as in what JimB suggests, I'd just like to know if it's the same as short-range for these purposes.
     
  6. cmyguo3o

    cmyguo3o New Member

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    Could it be that "range" refers to the potential link distance that can be served and "hop" refers to the actual distance?
     
  7. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    hi,
    UHF/uWave radio interlinks over short distances.
    E
     

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  8. cowboybob

    cowboybob Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Speaking as an Amateur Radio Operator (K4NFF):
    "Short (or long )-hop" wireless generally refers to the use of the reflective properties of the ionosphere in radio communications. More vertically oriented wave propagation will result in "shorter" hops. Longer or multiple hops are also possible.
    upload_2016-11-21_9-37-11.png From: http://kd4nga.net/KD4NGA/Resources/..._ Radio Waves and Communications Distance.pdf

    It has also been used to describe "relayed" communications, tower to tower, as when using devices considered to be "short range", as explained below.

    "Short (as opposed to long) -range" wireless is generally considered very low power communications. Think line-of-sight, i.e., small hand held transceivers, or cell phones.
     
  9. JimB

    JimB Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    In the context of that presentation, "short hop" simply means "short distance".

    JimB
     
  10. cmyguo3o

    cmyguo3o New Member

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    Thank you, ericgibbs, cowboybob, and JimB! The term is now pretty clear to me both in the wide and narrow contexts.
     
  11. Mikebits

    Mikebits Well-Known Member

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    Back when I was a teen and built my own HF setup. We called it. "Skip". I had this old timer retired engineer who taught me about skip along many other RF design concepts. I was a nerd early on.
     

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