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Unusual SMD Resistor Markings

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Mikebits, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. Mikebits

    Mikebits Well-Known Member

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    I came across a SMD resistor with value markings that I have never seen before. (See image below). The Green resistor markings are new to me. So is it supposed to be 2000 with a x10 or what. I would just measure it, but it is in parallel with something that gives it a value around 1.2K
    Is there a marking standard like the EIA or something?
    Thanks

    smtresistor.png
     
  2. captainkirksdog

    captainkirksdog Member

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  3. schmitt trigger

    schmitt trigger Active Member

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    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm........
    A thermistor? Try heating it up to see if the resistance changes.
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Mikebits

    Mikebits Well-Known Member

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    Thanks but 200 ohm is not possible. As I had mentioned above, I measured ~1.2k, and we know resistor rule of thumb: By putting resistors in parallel you always get a smaller resistor and since I measured >1k the resistor must be > than 200.
    My curiosity got the best of me so I removed the resistor and measured it with my recently calibrated Keithly 2010 DMM. What I measured completely surprised me as I measured 2.799066k , not at all what I expected. Was the tiny sideways zeros actually an 8? Did I somehow damage the part when I removed it?
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
  6. Mikebits

    Mikebits Well-Known Member

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    I'm such a dope. Sure it makes sense now that I measured it out of circuit. It is just standard 4 digit marking code. The number 8 was just made goofy which threw me off. So we got 280 with a 10 time multiplier for 2800.
    Case closed
     

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