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sine wave to sawtooth wave

Discussion in 'Electronic Projects Design/Ideas/Reviews' started by mabauti, Nov 27, 2007.

  1. mabauti

    mabauti Member

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    I want to convert a signal from 8.5V 60hz sine wave to sawtooth 0-5V wave.

    so far I have this :

    [​IMG]


    My question is : Is there an easier way to do that?
    my final goal is to have a phase control circuit.
     
  2. Roff

    Roff Well-Known Member

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    If you want to eliminate the transformer and the negative supply, and your load is high impedance (comparator input?), maybe you can use the circuit below.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 27, 2007
  3. mabauti

    mabauti Member

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    What if I used the transformer anyway (120VCA>8.5VCA)?

    What if I would like to connect the circuit directly to the 120 AC power?
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Roff

    Roff Well-Known Member

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    Your original schematic implied that you already have an 8.5V peak sine wave. If you are actually getting the 8.5V sine from a transformer connected to the 120V mains, you can still use the schematic I posted. I am posting an alternate version that uses both phases out of the transformer. I show the option of getting your DC power directly from the transformer, which may or may not be useful.
    Keep in mind that any of these schemes, including yours, will probably be susceptible to power line (mains) transients, but that may not cause a problem. Phase control, in fact, will tend to put transients on the AC line.
     

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  6. mabauti

    mabauti Member

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    Thank you very much Roff ! =)
     
  7. Roff

    Roff Well-Known Member

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    Please let us know if it works for you.
     

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