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Simple question: what is this?

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals or Parts' started by Reon636, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. Reon636

    Reon636 New Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm new here and even if I've been working with computers for a long time I got into the electronic circuits world just recentely, so I understand the basics of electronic systems but I'm not very familiar with complex circuits and things like that. I'm saying this only to make clear that there are some components that I don't know well.
    So the question is, I started desoldering some components including things that look much like diodes but that don't have bars marking the catode and also have no resistance. They diode option on the multimeter detecs them as closes circuits. What are they? I initially though they were fake resistors (0\Omega resistors) but they don't look like them at all. I found them in a motherboard and in a PSUs.
    I enclose a photo.
    Thanks![​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    -forgot to say that I'm not English but I try to do my best at writing. Hope you don't mind if you see grammatical errors
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom78

    MaxHeadRoom78 Active Member

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    No image, if zero resistance then could be jumpers, or do you mean they read infinity.
    Also inductors.
    No photo?
    Max.
     
  3. cowboybob

    cowboybob Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Welcome to ETO, Reon636!

    Your English looks fine.

    Try loading (or copy/pasting) the image again.
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Reon636

    Reon636 New Member

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    Updated image. Do you see it now?
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom78

    MaxHeadRoom78 Active Member

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    Looks like a ferrite bead. a solid conductor through a ferrite core.
    Acts as an inductance or HF suppressor.
    Max.
     
  7. Reon636

    Reon636 New Member

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    And what's it for?
    -edit: sorry didn't read the last part
     
  8. cowboybob

    cowboybob Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    No.
     
  9. cowboybob

    cowboybob Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Now yes, I see it.

    I think Max is correct. Device like that is meant to reduce high frequency noise on a line.
     
  10. Reon636

    Reon636 New Member

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    I see it, and also Max seems to.
    Anyway I've made some research and this little thing is most likely a ferrite bead. As Max said it looks like it's used to minimize electrical noise. This actually makes sense because I've got a sort of big version of the component in the photo that I found around the front panel audio cables of a computer, which for personal experience tend to carry noisy sounds because of electrical interferencs. Cool. Thanks a lot
     
  11. cowboybob

    cowboybob Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Sometimes on this site, posts that are very close together are a tad fast for the system (or maybe my computer... :banghead:)... Note the current post times for posts #3 and #4 (no difference).
     
  12. Reon636

    Reon636 New Member

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    [​IMG]
    So this is the big ferrite bead with a 3-pole electrical cable in it. Looks exactly like the first one.
    Thanks to everyone!
     
  13. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. Tony Stewart

    Tony Stewart Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    a security tag? I wonder how it works with magnets in motor nearby.

    It doesn't look like plastic, so I would say its an RF choke made of ceramic.
     
  15. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    I can attest that the "RF choke" looking thing was nothing but a holder for store anti-theft tags that can be de-activated at the register. The tags are about 1/4"W x 1.5" long x 1/8" thick and are usually white with sticky stuff on one side.
     
  16. Les Jones

    Les Jones Well-Known Member

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    If it is a ferite bead it will be attracted by a magnet.

    Les
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  17. Tony Stewart

    Tony Stewart Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Does it look like this?
    [​IMG][​IMG] This is only a simple ferrite bead.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016

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