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My first PCB

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Marks256, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. Rolf

    Rolf Member

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    Potential Health Effects of Ferric Cloride

    If you think ferric cloride is so safe, read this:

    Potential Health Effects of Ferric Cloride
    ---------------------------------------

    Inhalation:
    Extremely destructive to tissues of the mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract. Symptoms may include burning sensation, coughing, wheezing, laryngitis, shortness of breath, headache, nausea and vomiting.
    Ingestion:
    Corrosive. Swallowing can cause severe burns of the mouth, throat, and stomach. Can cause sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea. Low toxicity in small quantities but larger doses (30 mg/kg) may cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Pink urine discoloration is a strong indicator of iron poisoning. Liver damage, coma and death may follow, sometimes delayed as long as three days.
    Skin Contact:
    Corrosive. Symptoms of redness, pain, and severe burn can occur.
    Eye Contact:
    Corrosive. Contact can cause blurred vision, redness, pain and severe tissue burns.
    Chronic Exposure:
    Repeated ingestion may cause liver damage. Prolonged exposure of the eyes may cause discoloration.
    Aggravation of Pre-existing Conditions:
    No information found.
     
  2. Marks256

    Marks256 New Member

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    ..And mixing your own chemicals is?

    I don't think anyone plans on etching in a closet...
     
  3. Andy1845c

    Andy1845c Active Member

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    Yeah, its really nasty stuff. It etches concrete quite well when diluted, it really chomps at it full strength. Put a penny in it undiluted and you will have flakes in a matter of minutes. I put a super rusty iorn horseshoe that had been in the mud for 50 or 60 years in it overnight and it took it right down to bare metal.

    I think when I do get all the stuff to try it i'll do it at my machine shop with the ventilation fan on. I don't know that I really want that stuff in my house!
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Marks256

    Marks256 New Member

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    Would this be a perfect time to question my need for etching? :D
     
  6. Marks256

    Marks256 New Member

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    Crap! I just realized i don't have a laser printer! What can i do?
     
  7. Andy1845c

    Andy1845c Active Member

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    Print it out inkjet and use a copy machine?
     
  8. justDIY

    justDIY Active Member

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    use a photocopier or a public library
     
  9. kchriste

    kchriste New Member Forum Supporter

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    Or.... Save it as a GIF and email it to yourself at school or work and print it there. (Eagle imbeds the DPI in the file so it should print correctly)....
     
  10. Marks256

    Marks256 New Member

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    Is there a certain amount of time i have to put the image on the board from the paper?
     
  11. paparts

    paparts New Member

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    I am just having also my circuit. I am using paint as a PCB maker this is one of the examples I am using. After creating it I printed it to a Acetate the one used in projectors. I ironed it on my PCB(you must let it cool before removing the acetate) and I itched it and drilled the holes and connected my IC's. For me, I prefer using paint because its easy. When I was soldering the IC's I encountered 2 pins connecting so I used a Soldering paste to avoid this. It is really important using a paste to avoid unwanted connections.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2007
  12. Marks256

    Marks256 New Member

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    "paint" would work for simple projects, but an eeprom programmer requires A LOT of connections...
     
  13. kchriste

    kchriste New Member Forum Supporter

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    I've heard that you should iron it just after you print it for best results, but I printed mine at work and ironed it about 5 hours later with no problems. I had the same issue as you; no laser at home. Just make sure the laser is set for the darkest toner setting and not running in "econo mode"...
     
  14. Gayan Soyza

    Gayan Soyza Active Member

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    Thankx Someuseful informations.Same way I did but when removing the paper by peeling off is the hardest part.the first layer in the paper can remove easily & the next layer is very hard to remove even with a toothbrush.It has got stucked.with the thumb pressure can remove but the edges get jammed.
     
  15. Rolf

    Rolf Member

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    Please explain how using soldering paste prevents shorts, caused by solder bridges.
     
  16. philba

    philba New Member

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    answers to questions and points raised in several postings:
    it's possible but a lot of effort. I'd just get eagle (or some other schematic capture/PCB package). Eagle does several things that you can't with paint: verifying correctness, design rule checking, tracking schematic changes, exact scale, chip pads/outlines, ...
    It doesn't prevent it but, in theory, you only apply enough so there is no excess which avoids bridging. In theory, anyway. The better way to avoid bridges is having a pcb with a solder mask. You can also use flux to increase the attraction of bare metal to solder and thus decrease the probability of bridging.
    Think about what you are doing - you're etching. That means to remove metal. You aren't going to find any etchant that doesn't come with a lot of warnings. If the warnings bother some one, they should take up knitting. FeCl is nasty stuff, Ammonium Persulphate (AP) is nasty stuff, HCl is nasty stuff, H2O2 is nasty stuff. On the use of HCl, be aware that the bubbles are hydrogen gas. It's lighter than air and can collect in pockets - explosive pockets. I wouldn't use this to etch and would have lots of ventilation if I did use it. FeCl is nasty because it stains most everything it touches and you can't see the progress of your etching. It's cheap, though. I personally use AP since it is fairly benign, doesn't stain much and is clear so I can watch it progress. More expensive, though.
     
  17. paparts

    paparts New Member

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    Soldering paste

    This seperates unwanted connection, it only stick on the bronze
     
  18. Rolf

    Rolf Member

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    I was tough that soldering paste was for plumbers and had no use in electronic assembly. (but I have used in an emergency)
    The reason the normal solder with a rosin core is not flowing on the copper is;
    the copper is not clean, copper oxidizes fast and most be cleaned shortly before soldering. I just shine it by rubbing it with a large art eraser until it shines. Then there are no problems with soldering or bridging.
     
  19. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Don't EVER use plumbers flux for electronics, it's highly corrosive and not in any way suitable. You can buy tins of proper flux for electronics soldering, which is fine - but it's only really used for fairly obscure projects, and not for solering components to PCB's where the internal flux in the solder is all you need (anyway, how do they get the cores of flux in the solder?.

    But liquid flux is commonplace, for used with SM devices - and I even use it for larger soldering jobs, such as soldering an aerial socket back on a tuner - it helps the solder to flow, and go where you want it to better.
     
  20. Marks256

    Marks256 New Member

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    I haven't looked yet, but are there any good tutorials available for Eagle? I used it once, but then my HD crashed and i never got around to re-installing it. I did like it, though...
     
  21. philba

    philba New Member

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    yes, there are several tutorials. google for them.

    also, check out the al williams book. making pcbs at home (or some such title). He uses eagle throughout the book and it's a very good eagle tutorial.
     

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