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Measure Daily Output of a Solar Panel

Discussion in 'Renewable Energy' started by Moneer81, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. Moneer81

    Moneer81 New Member

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    Hello,

    I am trying to measure and compare the total daily output of two identical solar panels: one is stationary and the other tracks the sun. I know how to measure the voltage acorss a load and determine the power but what is the best way to measure the total power produced, from sunrise till sunset, on these panels?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Willbe

    Willbe New Member

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    Total energy. . .?

    Assuming a resistive load:
    .....you could make an amp-hour meter from an IC Voltage-Frequency Convertor
    http://www.national.com/mpf/LM/LM331.html
    and a shunt resistor. The Freq. increments a counter. Total count + total time = total amp-hours.
    .....You also need a voltmeter that displays average voltage. Use another V-F convertor and counter and divide the voltage count by the hours.
    .....Then you have average V and total amp-hours, and so total watt-hours.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2008
  3. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    hi,
    Are you planning to record every day or just a day or so.?
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Moneer81

    Moneer81 New Member

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    Sorry for the late reply. I am just planning to record a day or so. Any suggestions?

    Willbe - thanks for your suggestion. Is that the only method to do so?

    Thanks.
     
  6. mneary

    mneary New Member

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    Do you have an 'identical' charger and storage battery for each solar panel? Just charge both batteries and then discharge each one under identical conditions (Same inverter powering the same load. Inverter should have a low-battery cutoff. Measure time to cutoff for each battery. Swap batteries and repeat the next day.)
     
  7. Leftyretro

    Leftyretro New Member

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    Well if you are only going to compare a couple of days differences you might consider the following lower cost but more math solution.

    If you wire both panels to identical load resistors and place each resistor in identical size oil baths you could trend the temperature rise of both baths over time. After you acquire the raw data you can use excel to calculate the power generated by each panel over time. I'm sure a little searching could find the proper temp/BTU/Calories/watts relationship. Again this would require more math but the hardware cost should be lower.

    Lefty
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2008
  8. Willbe

    Willbe New Member

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    I guess you could add charge in chunks to two capacitors using sampling and the final "volt-hours" and amp-hours would correspond to the capacitor voltages. Then you multiply once.
    Exactly how to do this with rising and falling voltages doesn't exactly jump out at me. One of these, maybe. . .?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charge_pump
    but I've never designed one.

    Or
    a voltage controlled current source (an FET or vacuum tube) feeding the cap, with ΔV across the cap = IΔT/C. 1v cell voltage means 1 mA into the cap, 10v means 10 mA, and for a 1000 µF cap you apply the 1 mA current for 10 mS and you get 10 mV.
    Adjust the current and its duration to avoid voltages higher than the cap's rating by the end of the day.
    You'll need low-leakage caps.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2008
  9. leedude

    leedude New Member

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    for watts:
    put some resistance on the output of each panel, and measure the voltage across the resistor.

    P = V²/R
    power = voltage²/resistance
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2008
  10. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    hi,
    As its only a few days I would suggest the following.
    Interface a MCP3204 , 4 channel 12bit ADC to the parallel port of a PC.
    Use two of the channels to monitor panel voltage and the other two channels for current.

    This would give W1 = V1*I1 and W2 = V2*I2 which could be plotted on the PC.

    If you decide on this method I could help out with the PC interface details and a simple log program.:)
     
  11. Moneer81

    Moneer81 New Member

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    I am aware of that. The question is how do you keep track of the power through out the day, and how do you record it and add it up?
     
  12. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Was my suggestion of any use.?
     
  13. jfedison

    jfedison New Member

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    Logging solar irradiance data

    Hello,

    Another approach would be to log the solar irradiance from sensors placed next to each panel. Assuming the panels are identical, this would tell you how much energy you are getting for each configuration. The comparison will vary depending on the cloud conditions and angle of the sun and panels. A clear day would be a good starting point for comparison.

    You can check out the following link for a "solar data logger" kit that logs solar irradiance and cummulative incident energy.

    Micro Circuit Labs SDL-1

    The kit manual describes how to compute cumulative solar energy in kWh from logged irradiance data as well as some other background on solar power.

    Hope that helps.
    Jeff Fedison
    Micro Circuit Labs
     
  14. Mike_2545

    Mike_2545 Super Moderator

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    Use a sunny boy inverter. Hook it to a sunny web box and presto they track the output for you!
     
  15. Xan

    Xan New Member

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    Hi!

    An idea I thought ov a while ago to do something similar to this was to get a cheap electric clock & replace the one transistor ocillator with a circuit where the freq is current dependant.

    Not sure if the releationship between the time measured would be that linear using this method but if you made up two they could be used for comparison purposes.

    With suitable calibration you could make the hands ov the clock move say 1 hour if there's 1 amp flowing for that time, but as I said under or over this current it might not be linear.

    Hailz!

    Xan
     
  16. KMoffett

    KMoffett Well-Known Member

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    Xan,

    "Cheap" electric clocks (i.e. 1.5V desk and wall clocks) have crystal oscillators and are very accurate even as the batteries run down. They are not current dependent.

    Ken
     
  17. Willbe

    Willbe New Member

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    If you get more than 0.15 hp per sq. yd. of solar panel, you're doing pretty well.
     
  18. Mike_2545

    Mike_2545 Super Moderator

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    This is how I do it...

    The 577 Foundation

    Go to the page above and click on the charts it will show you daily hour averages and you can get monthly charts showing daily KWH production. The link also talks about BTU production from solar water heating panels. Lots of other solar charting and great stuff. I really had fun with that project.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2009
  19. duffy

    duffy New Member

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    Wow, that's a really nice setup. I like the online monitoring.
     
  20. Xan

    Xan New Member

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    Using a Clock to measure Solar power output.

    I realise that they have xtal ocillators in them. What I'm saying is disconnect that, get rid ov it & connect instead an ocillator that can have it's freq changed by a voltage or current input to the electromagnet that makes the pendulum swing.

    You would have to convert the voltage to current because a solar panel's voltage stays fairly constant throughout the day if it's lightly loaded, then falls off quickly as the sun is setting. But I guess you would be loading it heavily as you want to figure out the total power it produces.

    Hailz!

    Xan
     
  21. Mike_2545

    Mike_2545 Super Moderator

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    Xan,
    getting a clock to run off of solar panels will not tell you output in KWH, efficiency, or in any way be a good indication of power produced. At best it would be able to tell you for how long the sun shone that day. Solar panels are not simply on or off they fluctuate with available sunlight. That is dependent on many factors such as; time of year, cloud cover, distance from equator, whether it's fixed or tracking. If it is tracking ,is it single or dual axis? All of which contribute to the performance of a given panel.
     

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