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Hitachi HM6116ZP-4 CMOS RAM Datasheet

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals or Parts' started by Krumlink, Mar 15, 2008.

  1. Krumlink

    Krumlink New Member

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    Anybody got a datasheet for Hitachi HM6116ZP-4 CMOS RAM

    http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G14750

    Hitachi 2048-word x 8-bit high speed CMOS static RAM. These have been discontinued years ago but there are still many circuits that use them. We have a very limited quantity. Prime Hitachi branded!

    Features:
    Single 5V supply
    High Speed: Fast access time
    Directly TTL compatible
    Equal access and cycle time
    Completely static RAM: No clock or timing strobe required

    24 pin DIP.
    G14750

    I was going to purchase one, but I would like to look at teh datasheet first.
     
  2. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    The 6116 is pretty much a generic chip and so any data sheet will do. Googleing 6116 gives this which should tell you everything you need to know.

    What are you thinking of using it for?

    Mike.
     
  3. Krumlink

    Krumlink New Member

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    Wow pommie THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!

    I am using this for the relay computer's memory RAM. It will be easy to interface it.
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Krumlink

    Krumlink New Member

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    I am going to need help to understand this. So to program this, how would I do that? Would I send it into the A bus or the I/O bus?
     
  6. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    To access the 6116 you need to setup the 11 address lines and the data lines. You then either set /wr and /cs low to write the location or /oe and /cs low to read it. It is ideal for a relay computer as there is no multiplexed busses and 2k is probably more than enough memory. To connect it to a pic would require most of the pic I/O and so would be a bad choice.

    Mike.
     
  7. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    G'Day Mike,
    What he could do is to use a 8255 PIO between the PIC and the [static] 6116 RAM.
    As the 'relay' computer will be slow, the PIO setup/loading shouldnt slow things down.
    Krumlink, Google for a 8255 PIO datasheet.
     
  8. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Gday Eric,

    Aren't you in effect multiplexing thing by using an 8255. The simplicity of the non multiplexed bus is a definite advantage if your building a relay computer. Also, the fact that you will need ram in order to access the 8255 makes it doubly not a good idea.

    Mike.
     
  9. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi Mike,
    I have used the 8255 as an expander in the past with good results.

    Ref attached image.

    A more elegant way, would be a serial/I2C Ram.

    Krumlink.
    Any chance of a block diagram of the 'relay' circuit.?
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2008
  10. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Hi Eric,

    Using an 8255 with a pic chip to access a 6116 would be the way to go. For a relay computer I think it would actually complicate matters. Assuming that the Harvard architecture would be the simplest to implement in relays, then having ram and rom on the simplest busses would be the way to do it.

    To use any serial eeprom would further complicate matters and again would require other ram in order to implement it. You would require a loadable address counter + a bit counter, not to mention some way to shift the address out.

    I'm assuming that a relay computer would have rom/ram for code, ram for variables, no stack and switches/leds for I/O.

    Mike.
     
  11. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    hi Mike,
    I thought Krumlink was making a pseudo 'relay' computer by using a PIC, this appears to be an incorrect conclusion.:)

    You are burning the midnight oil again.;)

    Regards
     
  12. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Naaarh, only 10pm here.

    Mike.
     
  13. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    But the 8255 is a really limited 'horrible' device, there are MUCH better PIO chips available (like the 6522 for a start).

    But considering this is supposed to be for a 'relay computer', isn't the memory supposed to made of relays? - isn't that the point?.
     
  14. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    That should indeed be the point. However, if you look at the link I posted on the other relay computer thread then the relay computer is the ALU and associated address/data busses. The actual memory used was silicon. Even with silicon memory the thing was still huge and not something I would like to attempt building. If you did do relay memory then you are going to be pushing the envelope at 256 bytes.

    Mike.
     
  15. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Well based on past experience, I don't think there's a chance he's going to build it anyway! :p
     
  16. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    We were all that enthusiastic once and shouldn't knock it. However, your probably right.

    Mike.
     
  17. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Considering this
    http://www.electro-tech-online.com/threads/googl-the-beam-light-seeker.37348/
    is about as far as he goes, I can't see him building anything like a relay based computer :p

    And to be honest, it's seriously a complete waste of time and money anyway, if (for historical reasons) you wanted to see what one was like, it would be fairly easy to write a simulator on a PC.
     
  18. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    hi Nigel,
    I did say in the 'past', I suppose I should I should have said, 'in the distant past'.
    Remember at one time time, it was cutting edge!.:p
     
  19. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Nigel,
    You are absolutely correct, however, at his age I was going to conquer the world and be the most famous person ever. Unfortunately, I only managed half of that.:rolleyes:

    The youth of today should be encouraged at every step. Krumlink appears to have a lot of enthusiasm and gets on and does things. Let's encourage him and others to have a go.

    Mike.
     
  20. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Mike,

    For whats its worth, I agree 100%

    I achieved most of my goals and I try to help others to do the same...:)
     
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  21. blueroomelectronics

    blueroomelectronics Well-Known Member

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    3V0 managed to focus Krumlink for a short while, and Krumlinks school robot (with the globe) looked great (was it a VEX?).
    Krumlink appears to be driven by visual / physical projects. A microcontroller IC looks pretty meek and may appear uninteresting compared to something mechanical.
    [​IMG]
    Differential engine (an early mechanical computer) the meccano version is a monster.

    [​IMG]
    This wee 12F509 device is a very power micro computer
     

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