1. Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.
    Dismiss Notice

From (12v 2.5A DC) to (12v 1.0A DC)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Adam Binder Rogacki, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. crutschow

    crutschow Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    10,610
    Likes:
    478
    Location:
    L.A., USA Zulu -8
    That's why we kept asking the question, as we suspected you had a non-problem.
    Many devices such as motors and appliances only take the current they need.
    For example, you can turn on your car heater fan that takes a few amps and it's connected to a battery that can supply several hundred amps without any problems
    It will only draw its rated current and so will your motor, even if connected to a supply that can deliver 100A.
     
  2. ci139

    ci139 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Likes:
    37
    likely over your capabilities but not your EE aware friend's https://www.microsemi.com/document-...iting-techniques-for-switching-power-supplies
    also does not your device have integrated pwm load/speed control as many portable tools do . . .
    . . . an alternative easy solution that requires experimental pick of suitable components is incandescent bulb OR multiple matrix (← may have unsuitable reaction delay) OR a std. series over current limit https://en.tdk.eu/tdk-en/545938/pro...c-thermistors-for-overcurrent-protection?t=ps (← !! likely !! reacts faster) , http://www.resistorguide.com/ptc-thermistor/ by https://www.google.com/search?q=overcurrent+protection+nonlinear+resistor
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
  3. hyedenny

    hyedenny Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Messages:
    75
    Likes:
    3
    With all due respect, and no insult intended, is English your first language? Second? Third?
    Again, no disrespect -- it would just explain why I can never understand any of your posts.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 1997
    Messages:
    -
    Likes:
    0


     
  5. throbscottle

    throbscottle Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,802
    Likes:
    113
    Location:
    Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK

    I think it's just the language that geniuses speak...
     
  6. throbscottle

    throbscottle Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,802
    Likes:
    113
    Location:
    Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK
    It may be the way the D+ and D- pins are wired. I think there are about 3 different ways :eek:
     

Share This Page