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From (12v 2.5A DC) to (12v 1.0A DC)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Adam Binder Rogacki, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. Adam Binder Rogacki

    Adam Binder Rogacki New Member

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    Hello, I have a power supply that goes in the wall charger from 220v AC or something to 12v 2.5A DC, but I want to decrease the 12v 2.5A DC to 12v 1A DC...
    Can someone help me to tell how I get 12v 2.5A to 12v 1A?

    Best regards Adam.
     
  2. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Whatever you are powering will take what it needs. No need to reduce anything. However, I don't understand the term "goes into the wall charger"!

    Mike.
     
  3. Colin

    Colin Member

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    Your wall charger is already 12v @ 1 amp.
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. Adam Binder Rogacki

    Adam Binder Rogacki New Member

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    I have a power supply that outputs 12v 2.5A DC, but I wanna reduce the current to 12v 1A DC, so is there any way I can do that?
     
  6. JonSea

    JonSea Well-Known Member

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    As long as the voltsge is correct, the current can be what you need or greater. The load will only draw the current it needs.

    Think about plugging in a lamp. The same outlet can handle a 4 watt night light, a 60 watt general purpose bulb or a big 200 watt reader.
     
  7. ClydeCrashKop

    ClydeCrashKop Well-Known Member

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    Maybe he has a coil or something that gets hot at 2.5 amps and he wants to reduce the current. That is a legitimate question.
     
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  8. Pommie

    Pommie Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    Then he will overload the power supply and reduce the voltage.

    Mike.
     
  9. ClydeCrashKop

    ClydeCrashKop Well-Known Member

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  10. JonSea

    JonSea Well-Known Member

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    Since a constant current source isn't a usual thimg (but becoming moreso for LED lighting), and the original post didn't mention a constant current source, maybe it's best to assume horse not zebras and get too far a field.

    I will bet the OP has dome device the specifies a 12v 1 amp power supply and he's worried about plugging in a 2.5 amp supply.
     
  11. Daniel Wood

    Daniel Wood Member

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    My friend (while we were taking an electronics diploma) was on amazon for a phone charger. I said go for the 2A version. After a heated debate, we went for a more expensive 500mA version, and told me that he did not want to damage his phone while charging... :banghead:
     
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  12. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid Well-Known Member

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    Adam - why do you think the current needs to be reduced?

    What is the device you are connecting to the supply?

    Also, do you know if your supply is a linear of switching type? Can you post a photo?

    Once we know the details of your application, the quality of some of the responses might change.

    ak
     
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  13. ronsimpson

    ronsimpson Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    This is like a person with a 2.5 liter bottle of water. The person can only drink 1 liter of water. No one said you must drink all the water.
    lol----------------------------lol
    Remember when Mother said; "You can not play until you drink all your water and eat all your food". Mother is wrong. You should eat and drink the right amount and leave behind what you can not hold. Leave food for those "starving children in Africa".
    What did your mother say to get you to eat too much?
     
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  14. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    USB is crazy anyway. So, I bought a 2.1 A charger with a 12 V lighter and 120 V input with two ports.
    One will charge my cell and the other won't. The cell charges at 500 mA. My GPS charges at 1.5 A. I can charge both items together if I plug them in a certain way. No mention of anything to that effect on the box.

    I have one of those USB voltage/current inline meters to check.
     
  15. ci139

    ci139 Active Member

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    it is not the current been reduced - but the output voltage - ever faster satrting from certain current - specified as the current rating of the supply
    unless the load is (a sophisticated circuit) drawing as much as possible from input until the input voltage drops below certain margin
     
  16. Adam Binder Rogacki

    Adam Binder Rogacki New Member

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    Hello, it is this one. I wanna reduce the current to 1A.
     

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  17. JonSea

    JonSea Well-Known Member

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    Since apparently you didn't read any of the replies....

    WHY do you want to reduce the current?
     
  18. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid Well-Known Member

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    That is a switching power supply which means it has a well regulated output.

    Why do you think you need to reduce the output current?

    ak
     
  19. crutschow

    crutschow Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

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    You won't get an answer to yout question until you answer ours about "why do think the current needs to be reduced?".
     
  20. Adam Binder Rogacki

    Adam Binder Rogacki New Member

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    I have a DC motor that only can handle 12v 1A but my power supply is 12v 2.5A, so I wanna reduce the current to 1A so I can run my motor.
     
  21. JonSea

    JonSea Well-Known Member

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    As has been explained about, you can run your 12 volt motor on the 2.5 amp supply. It will only draw the current it needs.

    See my comments above.
     
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