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frequencies used by mobile phones

Discussion in 'Radio and Communications' started by harika17, Feb 15, 2016.

  1. harika17

    harika17 New Member

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    Can anyone one tell how to know frequency with which my mobile is transmitting and receiving signals and how to detect them?
     
  2. Ian Rogers

    Ian Rogers Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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  3. P25

    P25 New Member

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    If you want to know the exact frequency, having a spectrum analyzer nearby while it is transmitting is probably the best way to find out the frequency on which it is transmitting. Failing this, a much less expensive option would be a frequency counter.

    Knowing what frequency it is receiving could be calculated based on frequency on which it is transmitting and knowing the spacing according to the band plan and network technology.

    If you just want to know the bands, either check the manual that came with the device, or do a web search on the device's model number.

    Thanks,

    Nic
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. mdanh2002

    mdanh2002 Member

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    Most phones sold in Singapore (and in many other countries) are quad-band and can be used world-wide in most GSM networks. They are not carrier-locked either. It is mostly the US (and the Japanese perhaps) that like to sell single-band, carrier-locked phones and upsell people to pay more to 'unlock' their devices to be able to use them worldwide.
     

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