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Floor Fan Repair

Discussion in 'Repairing Electronics' started by fanrepair, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. fanrepair

    fanrepair New Member

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    I have a Restoration Hardware Allaire Telescoping Floor fan that I have had for about nine years. It recently stopped working, so I opened it up, cleaned out all the dust, and lubricated it to no avail. I next replaced the capacitor and re-lubricated it. The fan worked perfectly for a few days, but then it suddenly died out.

    I actually heard it die while laying in bed. It was like the power to the motor decreased and it started turning more slowly until it finally stopped. At that point, I could turn the motor on and hear it hum, but the fan would not move even though the blades still spun freely. I opened it back up, and everything seemed to be in order, except that I noticed that it was dry as if I had never lubricated it before. I lubricated it again (all lubrication was using 3-in1 oil), and it began to work fine again for a few more days before the same problem developed again.

    Is there a different lubricant I should be using/area of the fan I am not lubricating correctly, or is there another component that needs to be replaced. I would hate to junk this fan as it seems capable of working again.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Nigel Goodwin

    Nigel Goodwin Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    I wouldn't have thought oil would stay in the bearing very well, grease would be better - presumably you cleaned the old grease out and put oil in it's place?.
     
  3. fanrepair

    fanrepair New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    Perhaps "bearing" isn't the right word. Where the shaft passes through the face of the fan and connects to the blades, there is a small hole, and it actually appeared to have a cloth ring around the hole. I lubricated the shaft and put oil on this part too since this seemed to be a likely spot where metal could potentially rub metal.

    There was grease in the back assembly that houses the oscillation mechanism. I cleaned out and replaced what I could from this part (it is assembled so that I cannot open it fully without damaging it). But I don't think this is the problem because I actually ran the fan without reattaching the oscillation unit, and I had the same thing happen - it ran for a few days, then died.

    I have also pulled the entire rotor assembly out of the winding (I didn't need to mess with any of the winding to do this), and lubricated the face of that too. I noticed when it died again that this part was bone dry. I figured that maybe I didn't use enough oil, so I lubricated this part more heavily the second time, and the same result - it died a few days later and when I opened it, it was bone dry.

    I haven't found any reservoir for lubricant, and I was wondering if perhaps I'm not using the correct oil. Perhaps the motor runs too hot and is burning it off. But I have visited forums that discuss antique fan restoration, and the 3-in-1 oil is what they say to use. I am hesitant to use a grease for fear of gumming up the rotor and damaging it.

    It doesn't seem like the capacitor is the problem because I have already replaced it, and after lubrication, the fan will run fine for a few days before dying again.

    I'm hoping that it's not a problem with the winding because that would likely just require me to replace the fan since it would be cost prohibitive to rewind it.

    Thanks again for the reply.
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. dumpsterdiver

    dumpsterdiver New Member

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    I have a desk fan,a pole(floor) fan and another desk fan at work that I recovered from the dumpster. They each got a complete disassembly and cleaning and my secret oil is: Transmission fluid. It's heavier than 3-in-1 but not too heavy. Those 3 fans have been running since 2009 or so! Take it apart once more, clean out the old oil on the bearing sleeves AND the motor shaft. Take a Q-Tip and soak the cotton in a solvent like acetone or carb cleaner and poke it down the bearing sleeves to remove any crud. Use a 2nd one soaked in the transmission fluid and put some on the motor shaft where it rides in the bearings. Then lube the bearing sleeves. Get the cloth ring saturated with the fluid. Soak up excess with the folded corner of a paper towel.
     
  6. Bills Hot Rods

    Bills Hot Rods New Member

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    Just now happened across this. I used to rebuild antique fans and had the same experience with finding a suitable lubricant for the shaft in its bushings. If you google antique fan repair and parts there is a site that sells "Purple oil" for fans. It is a bit pricey for the small amount you get but very little is needed per fan. About 2 oz in a small bottle with an eye dropper. I tried to figure what kind of oil it actually was and came to the conclusion it was most likely transmission fluid as recommended by the last member. I used the "Purple oil" on several fans , a couple that the shaft had quit turning altogether. After a thorough cleaning then using the oil in the reassembled fan I never experienced further failures due to lubricants.
     
  7. RODALCO

    RODALCO Well-Known Member

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    I have used roller bearing grease successfully in many fans with no problems. Get it from a car accessory shop.
     

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