1. Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.
    Dismiss Notice

Deception In Soldering Iron Ratings

Discussion in 'Electronic Projects Design/Ideas/Reviews' started by MrAl, Dec 3, 2014.

  1. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    I use a 1950s traditional soldering iron with a huge square copper bit for doing heavy soldering- it works a treat. It has no electrical heating element; you heat it up in a gas torch. It's not too good for surface-mount work though.:D

    spec

    2016_10_17_ETO_SOLDERING_IRON_TRADITIONAL_mod.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    11,042
    Likes:
    959
    Location:
    NJ
    Hi,

    Very interesting tool. They probably used that on lead piping :)
    Also looks like a medieval torture device :)
     
  3. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    Yes, its not intended for electrical work, but mainly for tin bashing, and the like.

    I use it for copper bus bars, about 7mm in diameter, in audio amps, power supplies, etc.

    It feels like a medieval torture device if you grab the wrong end.:eek:

    spec
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 1997
    Messages:
    -
    Likes:
    0


     
  5. throbscottle

    throbscottle Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,802
    Likes:
    113
    Location:
    Nuneaton, Warwickshire, UK

    I once used an iron similar to that (smaller, the end was about 1/2" to a side) to do something involving soldering pins of the 40 pin dip inside the multimeter I used to have, because my Antex had died :(
    I think the meter must have had a dry joint somewhere - can't remember now. It was awkward, but do-able.
     
  6. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    The blacksmiths iron is also handy when you need to use high melting point solder.

    Or if you have a ranch and want to mark your cattle with the 'Lazy Iron' brand.:)

    spec
     
  7. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    11,042
    Likes:
    959
    Location:
    NJ
    Hi,

    Oh, those poor cows, ouch :)
    But then they go right back to eating grass as if nothing had happened.
    I think it may have been on "American Dad" or "Family Guy" where they were branding a cow and it was going, "Oh yeah, yeah, yeah", as if it liked the pain from the branding iron. That was funny :)

    But hey you reminded me of my mini torch/soldering iron. The one i got was from Dremel. It's a mini torch that runs on butane and has a soldering iron tip attachment. Turning the torch on low the tip gets pretty hot pretty fast. Solders nicely i'd say small to medium size electrical soldering jobs. Might not do #6 wire but it should do #10 wire for example. Nice little invention. There are other brands too.

    On the other hand, my "Cold Heat" soldering iron should be called "Cold Crap" as it is very hard to use and makes crappy joints when it does work, and the tip breaks easy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
    • Funny Funny x 1
  8. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    Of course, real men use silver soldering and macho men use brazing, both very useful techniques.

    I have used silver soldering for repairing hand lamps and staplers, for example- works a treat and doesn't distort the base material too much. I also made a muffler, that was no longer available, for an old motorbike, using silver soldering.

    And made a complete exhaust system for my third automobile (Vauxhall Victor FE) by brazing gas pipe- it weighed a ton and sounded very odd, like a sumo wrestler far**ng down a err... gas pipe. When I took the Victor to a garage for an MOT (UK mandatory yearly road test), the mancanics laughed their sides out. As time went on the Victor rusted away , in spite of all my MIG welding, and all that was left in the end was my gas pipe exhaust.:joyful:

    spec
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
  9. MrAl

    MrAl Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    11,042
    Likes:
    959
    Location:
    NJ
    Hello again,

    Well i have to commend you on doing that rework mod on the exhaust system as i would have liked to do that on my old Hyundai. In the 20 years i had that car i went through 5 exhaust systems! Yes, front to back, entire systems, five times, because the pipes one of the Meineke shops used were too cheaply made. The last system i went to another shop and got better pipes even though they were a smaller diameter than the car had originally.
    I would have liked to install a custom set of pipes on that thing that were made of thicker metal, but it would have been very hard to do on that car so i had to keep buying systems. One time i got away with a single pipe purchased from an auto parts store for a good price, but then they stopped making those pipes so they had to be made custom from a shop like Meineke. That's one good thing about them, they make custom pipes to fit any car.
     

Share This Page