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Competition #2: Entries

Discussion in 'Competitions' started by 3v0, Dec 11, 2008.

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  1. 3v0

    3v0 Coop Build Coordinator Forum Supporter

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    The only thing posted to this thread will be contest entries for the

    MHLDC: Mini Holiday Light Display Contest​

    All other posts will be deleted.

    Post questions regarding the contest in the original MHLDC thread.

    Voting will be done via poll after the build period closes.

    3v0
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 25, 2009
  2. musthave

    musthave New Member

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    here my entry's. I build this a long time ago to control my christmas lights and party's lights it as 32 output 3 controller . its all TTL 70's thecnology74154 74193 7404 74168 555 and lots of triac's no PIC or PC input.
    YouTube - The Old ways
    YouTube - the old ways
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2008
  3. Boncuk

    Boncuk New Member

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    and here is my submission:

    YouTube - TWINKLING STARS

    This is how make stars twinkle:

    Using an MCU you'll be faced with the problem of generating random numbers. The easiest way is using a dual timer with two different frequencies and no integer division factor between freqencies. This example uses 350Hz for the clock and 180Hz for the clock inhibit signal. The decimal counter is inhibited at irregular intervals thus producing pseudo random numbers at its outputs.

    This way the HCF4017 can be used to connect 11 LEDs, (including the carry out). The twinkling varies in a very large range (from pseudo forward via any constellation up to pseudo backwards)

    Attached are the schematic, a PCB-layout, Eagle files and the photo of the sample circuit. (The LED carrier is a standard industrial chip carrier for SMD packages with lots of holes to place the LEDs in any desired location)

    Be advised that the circuit doesn't contain a current limiting resistor. A 390Ω (for 12V supply voltage and Uf=3.5V) resistor in the ground connection will suffice since there is only one LED lit at a time.

    Hans
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2009
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. shokjok

    shokjok Member

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    Here is my mundane entry. A schematic of my 20-year-old Christmas light chaser, originally designed to safely handle 50 lights per string. It can handle more than that, with proper safety precautions followed and being realistic. This same circuit was later modified to become a name-in-lights project for seven lucky female recipients, all are long since gone their separate ways from me.
    The video is on VHS, and cannot be uploaded in time for viewing. The tape is in a remote location, and I haven't attempted to upload video yet.
    This is a non-uC entry.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 9, 2009
  6. techmanx

    techmanx New Member

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    Fairground carousel

    I started this a few days ago before I knew you were running this comp, so its now finished (well finished enough for my original idea!).
    The idea came as an extra visual attraction for Christmas, and it is simply a fairground chair lift display.
    I manufactured the whole thing from paper (printed with the decorations!), and a piece or two of cardboard.
    The mechanics consist of a converted servo-motor as a slow speed controllable drive for the chair lift. The chairs are lifted up and down by means of a lightweight line that runs down the central column to the motor drive.
    The speed of the lift is varied and the chairs are stopped occasionally to simulate people getting on and off, etc.
    Nothing very clever, but looks pretty.
    The motor and the chasing LEDS are driven and controlled by a PIC 16F684 (one of my favourite Pics.).
    short Video attached. YouTube - thisone.mov
    I posted this in December but in wrong place.
     
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