1. Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.
    Dismiss Notice

But I'm a Hardware Guy

Discussion in 'Members Lounge' started by Mikebits, Mar 1, 2017.

  1. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    PS: Update: So that Mike's thread is not hijacked I may start a new thread about the ETOMHC.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  2. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    Hi Cicero,

    Far from being a negative aspect, as the tone of your post implies, it is a very healthy approach to any field.

    The moment anyone thinks they know it all and declair they are an expert they are doomed (there are true experts of course).

    The drive and ability to learn is the only way forward, especially in the fast moving electronics and technology arena.

    I have been a design engineer for many years and practically every week if not day I had to lean some new aspect as did the other engineers. The other thing is that it is very important to consider other peoples knowledge. Quite a few times we had a seemingly insolvable problem that the machine shop men, or wiremen sorted out because they could see things in a different way.

    And it was not unusual when starting a new project to not even know what the project name means. I had this on a job called 'Helicopter Radiometer'. I knew what a helicopter was but had no idea what a radiometer was and how to design one. But, within three months or so, thanks to an excellent book from the States, 'The Radiometer Handbook', I was the company hardware Radiometer 'expert'.

    spec
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
  3. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2007
    Messages:
    21,187
    Likes:
    644
    Location:
    Ex Yorks' Hants UK
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 1997
    Messages:
    -
    Likes:
    0


     
  5. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT

    Good point Eric, but at the formative stage the open forum would be more suitable to kick a few ideas around.

    spec
     
  6. ericgibbs

    ericgibbs Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2007
    Messages:
    21,187
    Likes:
    644
    Location:
    Ex Yorks' Hants UK
    IYO.
     
  7. Cicero

    Cicero Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2014
    Messages:
    335
    Likes:
    36
    Location:
    UK
    There are pro's and con's of either path.

    But someone who's been a jack-of-all-trades for 10 years will never be able to compete with someone who's been a HW or FW specialist for 10 years in their field. Meaning if you ever want to join a larger organisation in a role higher than junior...you're gonna have a hard time.
     
  8. JimB

    JimB Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2004
    Messages:
    6,329
    Likes:
    585
    Location:
    Peterhead, Scotland
    I don't think that I agree with that.
    The generalist (jack of all trades) often has a wider understanding of the system being worked on.

    Most industrial equipment is a mix of electrical, electronic, mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic sub systems.
    To build and maintain such a system requires a mix of skills.

    JimB
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
  9. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    The ability to learn, be objective and above all to have common sense will see you through.

    It is quite true that your CV is pretty much the only thing that a prospective employer has on you so, as far as getting a new job goes, it would be difficult to get a job in area that you were not experienced.

    On a number of occasions in our company a new man has taken a position well below his status. This applies especially to ex service personnel whose skills don't necessarily match civvy street.

    Two men in particular stand out. One started as a lab technician, the other although a senior officer in the RAF, started in a junior management position. The first built up a large department which he managed and the second ended up being managing director of our division.

    How did they do it- by hard work, common sense and risk taking. The first chap made his name when all the project managers declined to do a very risky (impossible) radar trial. But by his industry he made a big success of the project, so much so that there were follow-on contracts and then other non related contracts. I can remember saying to him when he volunteered to take on the risky project that he must be mad. One of his big skills was being able to sift the BS from facts and also to recognize peoples skills.

    A couple of his team were rough diamonds and didn't really fit in, but they did a damned good job of climbing up Scottish mountains, and installing radar antennas and generally getting things done. And after being in that role for a few years they had changed completely and not only being gung ho types but also good at customer meetings and designing the whole site installations for the trial.

    spec
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
  10. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    Very true Jim.

    In a big organization you need people with a variety of skills to succeed: all rounders, specialists, technical managers, project managers. Of all those, project manager is the most difficult and he truly is a jack of all trades (I was never a project manager by the way).

    In a small organization a jack of all trades is essential, almost by definition.

    spec
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
  11. ClydeCrashKop

    ClydeCrashKop Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Messages:
    1,018
    Likes:
    171
    Location:
    Florida
    I specialize in miscellaneous. It has served me well.
    I am well respected for being able accomplish anything their imaginations can come up with.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  12. JimB

    JimB Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2004
    Messages:
    6,329
    Likes:
    585
    Location:
    Peterhead, Scotland
    An excellent expression.
    I like it.

    JimB
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  13. spec

    spec Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    5,828
    Likes:
    709
    Location:
    Somerset UK GMT
    I have seen a few projects, as opposed to studies, manned totally by 'experts' and the projects have not turned out well.

    In one case the customer sued the company for a disastrous automatic spray plant design and in another case the airworthiness boys refused to certify a nose wheel camera.

    I got the job of sorting out the camera, so I got a recent graduate to do the technical stuff and a good guy from the machine shop. Within three months the camera had been sorted by them. We could not believe the circuit design of the camera which was done by a chartered engineer who certainly looked the part.:arghh:

    spec
     
  14. Ian Rogers

    Ian Rogers Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,164
    Likes:
    910
    Location:
    Rochdale UK
    ONLINE
    Okay!!!! Lets start again.... Mud slinging is my worst enemy....

    Back to Mike.....
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. KeepItSimpleStupid

    KeepItSimpleStupid Well-Known Member Most Helpful Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2010
    Messages:
    9,916
    Likes:
    1,097
    Don't forget the "entropy expert". They don't "plan" anything.
     

Share This Page