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ARM programming

Discussion in 'ARM' started by Powzoom, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. Powzoom

    Powzoom New Member

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    I need to work with the arm controllers but I am unsure of all the equipment I need. I'm looking at the ocd-tiny http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/pro...oducts_id=8278
    Will this program an at89C4051? Also, there is no dip ic slot. Do I need to make one? How do I get the code to the device? what software?

    I have experience with pics (pickit2) so I understand the basic process, I think.
     
  2. DirtyLude

    DirtyLude Well-Known Member

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    The USB-OCD-TINY will program all ARM based chips with JTAG that I know of. With an adapter and using Rowley Crossworks it will program any of the newer Cortex chips with Serial Wire Debug. It will work with the free GCC compiler and OpenOCD, but I found Eclipse and OpenOCD to be a real pain in the ass to try and work with.

    I don't understand why you mention the at89C4051, which is not ARM. So, if that's what you need to program, try the 8051 sub forum.

    ARM is a core architecture designer and there are chips out with a huge range of their cores from ARM9 and Cortex-A8 to much smaller Cortex-M3 and Cortex-M0. You need to narrow down exactly what it is you want to use.

    There might be some DIP packages with ARM cores on them, but I don't know of any. If you want to use ARM chips you'll need to learn how to use SMD packages, or buy breakout boards for whatever you are doing. The chips are programmed in circuit using a JTAG connection very similar to what you would have done with the PICKit2. The standard JTAG connector is a 20 pin IDC connector.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2010
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  3. Powzoom

    Powzoom New Member

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    That was a great anwser, thanks. I've looked into it some more. The project I'm on uses the at89 currently and is upgrading to the ARMs in the future. So I guess I would need both. I've read that you can program 8051 code using ms visual basic. Is this true?
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. DirtyLude

    DirtyLude Well-Known Member

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    I have no practical experience with 8051's, but I doubt that's true and if it is it would be a very scaled down subset of VB and not all that useful. Learn C now, because you will need it if you plan on doing anything serious with microcontrollers.
     

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